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Lim Kit Siang, Lim Guan Eng, Ketua Pemuda Umno and the absence of christian apologists

Lim Kit Siang and his ilk (including his son, Lim Guan Eng) will never fail us in delivering spiteful and racist festive messages promoting hate among the people of Malaysia.

Lim Guan Eng in his infamous Wesak Day speech some time ago was even more acrimonious and vindictive. He seditiously tried to agitate the buddhists and the christians against the malays and muslims.

Malicious people are incorrigible. Malaysia is truly unfortunate to have this father-son combo who preach fairness/equality and peace but in reality, a hypocritical duo of antagonists who will not hesitate to use religion, racism and dictatorial tactics just to attain and retain power.

Compared to the Prime Minister’s Christmas message which are inclusive and even reconciliatory, Lim Kit Siang’s holiday message seemed to be a call to religious war of sorts.  Will Lim Kit Siang see the faint light at the end of the tunnel and change for the better in the twilight of his years? Don’t hold your breath.

The Ketua Pemuda Umno too wrote a Christmas message in his facebook account. Although he claimed that it is not a standard christmas greeting by politicians, it is in fact a standard festive greeting usually written by malay apologists in web columns such as The Malaysian Insider.

He wrote:

This is not going to be a standard Christmas message. I thought this year, let’s not have someone draft the same generic message that politicians get their office to churn out year in, year out.

I went to a Catholic primary school in Japan. Unlike most convent schools in Malaysia, my school was run by Canadian Catholic priests. Many of my teachers were priests. Brother Raymond, a tall, curly-haired Québécois was once such teacher who left an impression on me about hard work and fair play.

Everyday we would begin school with prayer. For non-Christians like me we just bowed our head in silence out of respect while Christian students prayed. Sometimes I would recite the Al Fatihah quietly to myself. Sometimes I would just daydream.

There was a crucifix in every classroom. Brother Raymond wore a big cross around his neck on a chain on top of his black clerical shirt. Many of my friends went for their Holy Communion and had their pictures taken for the yearbook.

We all sang in a choir. When it came to Christmas, non-Christians also sang the non-religious songs. I think some even sang the religious songs but just kept quiet during certain lines!

I went to my friends’ houses for Christmas. I was given presents. My parents were well prepared so I brought presents with me also to give to my hosts.

None of this affected my own faith. My parents instilled in me a strong foundation in Islam. I led congregational prayers among my peers when I was small. I took part in Quran recitals organised by the embassy. Nothing I experienced at my Catholic school could undermine or shake my faith.

The point of my brief recollection is this: have faith in your own faith. If your belief is strong, no one can make you lose your religion.

And if you are sure of your own convictions, you will respect others even more. You won’t view them as a threat, as people secretly working to proselytise you. You might even learn from them as I did from Brother Raymond.

To everyone celebrating, have a happy Christmas.

What a touching christmas greeting. It is more of chastising the malay muslims here in Malaysia, rather than a direct message for the Christians here. Hence, due to his capacity as Ketua Pemuda Umno, he feels that it is his right to straighten his fellow muslims and therefore, a tacit apology for non-muslims for the behaviour of his fellow muslim brothers and sisters. In this regard since it is the Christmas period, the implied apology is for the christians.

It is certainly not wrong to ask for forgiveness and extend the olive branch. Thank you Ketua Pemuda for apologising on our behalf. A liberal will always be an apologist for his race.

Hopefully during Hari Raya Aidilfitri there will be christian politicians who will write in their Facebook like below. We have took the liberty to copy the Ketua Pemuda’s message and interchange certain keywords to fit the Hari Raya message appropriately:

This is not going to be a standard Hari Raya message. I thought this year, let’s not have someone draft the same generic message that politicians get their office to churn out year in, year out.

I went to a national primary school in Johor. Unlike most national schools in Malaysia, my school was run predominantly by malay muslims. Our headmaster was a strict ustaz. Many of my teachers were religious malay muslims. Cikgu Rizal, a tall, curly-haired malay was once such teacher who left an impression on me about hard work and fair play.

Everyday we would begin school with prayer. For non-Muslims like me we just bowed our head in silence out of respect while muslim students prayed. Sometimes I would recite some psalms quietly to myself. Sometimes I would just daydream.

There was an Allah inscription in every classroom. Cikgu Rizal wore a songkok and carries a small Yassin book whenever he goes. Many of my friends went for their Khatam Quran in the afternoon religious class and had their pictures taken for the yearbook.

We all sang in a choir. When it came to Hari Raya, non-Muslims also sang the non-religious songs. I think some even sang the religious songs but just kept quiet during certain lines!

I went to my friends’ houses for Hari Raya. I was given duit raya too and eat their Raya food.

None of this affected my own faith. My parents instilled in me a strong foundation in Christianity. I attend mass on Sundays with my peers when I was small. I took part in catholic choirs organised by the local church. Nothing I experienced at my primary school could undermine or shake my faith.

The point of my brief recollection is this: have faith in your own faith. If your belief is strong, no one can make you lose your religion.

And if you are sure of your own convictions, you will respect others even more. You won’t view them as a threat, as people secretly working to undermine your religion. You might even learn from them as I did from Cikgu Rizal.

To everyone celebrating, Selamat Hari Raya Aidifitri.

Will Hannah Yeoh write something similar? Will Lim Guan Eng pose this kind of messages?

For certain, only the malays are more tolerant and reconciliatory. Spiteful and racist politicians especially from DAP do not apologise for who they are.

We now have popular Umno leaders

“Perhaps the less we have, the more we are required to brag.” 

- John Steinbeck from his book, East of Eden

The majority of the thinking society would feel that a political leader needs to be inherently intelligent enough to know that doing things right is paramount than doing things just to be popular.

Take for example the previous Prime Minister. He wanted to do things which will make him popular with a few factions of people which in the end, led him to become the shortest serving Prime Minister in the history of Malaysia (at 5 years and 5 months, less than Tun Hussein Onn’s at 5 years and 6 months).

Being popular is good for a career in politics but that must be complimented with genuine hardwork and results which people can really see and experienced.

If wanting to be popular for the sake of being popular then people can easily see through the leaders’ smokescreen and be exposed as fake, or a con-artist. Not so much a leader, but a buffoon trying too hard to be popular.

The current Prime Minister and his cabinet has this tendency to be popular with the masses while disregarding the concept of good leadership. We can see the apex of the attempts to gain popularity concocted up by his advisors during the run up of the recent general election.

Ranging from giving too much money to vernacular schools, running election campaigns much akin to the US Presidential election (personality-driven) rather than a cohesive, BN driven (coalition-centric) campaigns, repealing important laws just to pander towards opposition sponsored ‘human rights’, etc.

But all these bending over backwards just to become popular did not yield the returns that they had hoped for. In fact, just as we had foreseen, the majority of the people saw it through and were not impressed. Popularity is never about one-off announcements to wow the crowd. It has never been about shock-factor (just to borrow a few of consultants’ jargons), quick-wins or ‘picking the low hanging fruits’.

Having a crowd to pat you on the back after giving out goodies to people will not make you more popular.

Even Winston Churchill kept perspective on the crowds that gathered to hear him speak by conceding they would be twice as big if they gathered to see him hanged.

Popularity is a series of leadership by example, a series of doing the right things and not flip flopping on decisions that will make you be seen as less intelligent. Above all, popularity will come when you do not seek it.

It’s all about action and results.

Actively trying to be popular without any substance to begin with will only make you look pathetic. Just look at Anwar Ibrahim for example. Those with critical thinking knew him as a snake oil salesman, who would sell his principles just to be popular. Even a foreign publication had called him a chameleon.

Even in his hey days of popularity back in 90s, that couldn’t make him last long in politics. As history sees it, his popularity did not save him from falling in disgrace – exposed for his inefficient handling of the 1998 currency crisis and engaged in morally wrong conduct.

On the contrary and of course as a lesson to the current crop of leaders, going against the tide will often make you last longer in politics.

Take Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad for example. He did several unpopular things during his premiership which will bring dread even to the most courageous of politicians. He sacked Anwar Ibrahim at the height of his deputy’s popularity, he clashed against the monarchy and kept their behaviours in check when a few of the rulers were misbehaving and unruly towards the people. These were extremely unpopular decisions at that time and could spell an end to a political career if popularity is what a leader seek.

But it was the right thing to do and Tun Mahathir did it because it was good for the people.

He even agreed to accept all 600,000 members of Semangat 46 back into Umno’s fold in 1996 for the sake of malay unity – a decision which was highly unpopular among Umno members when the likes of Rais Yatim, Tengku Razaleigh and Shabery Cheek returned to Umno after nearly 8 years as an opposition in Semangat 46.

In 1984, after Musa Hitam defeated Tengku Razaleigh again for the post of deputy president in Umno General Election, Tun Mahathir still appointed the latter as a minister eventhough Musa Hitam, a powerful Deputy Prime Minister and a Home Minister at that time was so much against it.

But he still appointed Ku Li nevertheless as the minister in MITI (albeit downgraded him from the Finance Minister post) since Ku Li is a capable leader and as the malay proverb goes – “kalah sekali, bukanlah kalah semua.”

Tun Mahathir made many unpopular decisions – be it concerning the capital controls during the currency crisis, his unwavering stance in curbing racist and religious extremists as well as his decisions to chastise the west and the jews for their hypocrisy and terrorism.

All these led him to become the longest serving (at 22 years 3 months) Prime Minister in the history of Malaysia.

Can we imagine any of the Prime Ministers after him doing such unpopular things? Of course we can’t. What is lacking in the current crop of Umno leaders is gumption and the believe of doing things right. In its place is the mistaken belief that their careers will last longer if they are popular. Unfortunately, they had got it backwards.

And it’s also a fact that Tun Mahathir is arguably the most popular Prime Minister we ever had. He is a walking and living brand and is a successful one at that. And all that stemmed from the fact of doing things right and not wanting to be popular.

How many times have we hear him say that he is merely stating the truth and do not care what people think about him? Plenty of times. He lives by his principles and sticks to it like glue.

On the contrary, what we have now are Umno leaders desperately trying to be popular.

Take for instance, the Ketua Pemuda Umno who is also the Minister of Youths and Sports. Apparently the day the kalimah Allah judgment was read out in the Courts of Appeal, the youth wing leader of agama bangsa dan negara party was more busy tweeting and promoting himself for a popularity contest.

bfsj

The winner of this popularity contest will be announced this Saturday

The Shout Awards is a popularity award show organised by Media Prima to honour popular artists in the field of music, tv, movies and radio.

But lo and behold, a minister crept in and found himself in the nominees list as well!

How more pitiful (deserving or arousing pity) can you be when you are already a minister but still want to vie in a popularity contest? A contest where you are not really in sync with any of the categories mentioned.

Truly this is a new low for Pemuda Umno and Umno as a whole. In the face of current issues facing the party and the malays such as the attacks on the kalimah ruling by the liberals, as well as on other fronts, did the Pemuda Umno made any statements to defend the position? The only notable but half hearted statement by Pemuda Umno was when they seek explanation over news of US spying from its KL embassy.

Apart from that, the now liberal Pemuda Umno Malaysia is more than happy to enter popularity contests or collect Pakatan Rakyat leaders as their fans. God forbid, even the incorrigible Lim Kit Siang is the number one fan of Ketua Pemuda Umno now.

Nobody pointed a gun to his head and made compulsory for him to join this fluffy event. Yet he is there, tweeting and soliciting votes from the masses to vote for him for this award.

The ridiculousness of this glam-craze escapade underlines a bizarre, yet comical attitude of the Ketua Pemuda in wanting to be popular at all cost. The less he have, the more he is required to brag.

But since this is an era of liberalism and where Umno leaders want to be popular regardless if they have any substance at all, we should not be surprised. The Prime Minister and his myriad of advisors themselves are also in the forefront and believer of populist movement.

Just sit back and enjoy the entertainment all these leaders are providing us. After all, Umno is now a play and some of their leaders are actors.

Thank you.

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You might like to read this too.

“Umno must choose leaders who had served the party from the lower ranks” says Ketua Pemuda’s mom

In News Straits Times today, where the editors appeared to be under the thumb of the Ketua Pemuda, an article was published on page 8 which had precisely shown how the editors can be quite naive in fulfilling the political agenda of the Ketua Pemuda.

EXPERIENCE COUNTS: They must heed needs of all races

Umno veterans say delegates who will be voting in the party election on Saturday should select vice-presidents and  leaders who are incorruptible and all-rounders.

They want the three vice-president posts to be given to candidates who have “climbed the ropes” and are well-versed with party affairs.

Umno Veterans Club secretary Datuk Mustapha Yaakub said the vice-presidents’ posts should be occupied by candidates who were prepared to work at any level.

“The delegates must choose leaders who are clean; free from corruption, have not misused funds, or been involved in any sex scandals.

“Reject candidates who are unscrupulous and are only out to seek a place in the supreme council for personal interests.”

This was what party president and prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak meant by a political transformation, he said.

Umno’s top leadership must be made up of those who understood the needs of the rakyat, he said, pointing out that come the next general election, the party would also have to gain support from non-Malay voters.

“If there is no such change, Umno will lose the support of the people. The party will cease to remain relevant,” he warned, reminding Umno members that the party’s fate was in their hands.

Outgoing Johor Umno liaison committee secretary Datuk Ahmad Zahri Jamil felt the top echelons in Umno should comprise personalities who had a thorough understanding of how to manage the country.

“Umno is a party that looks after Malay affairs, but as stated in the Constitution, the rest of the population must also be looked after.

“It is, therefore, imperative that the next leadership, especially the vice-presidents and the supreme council members, hold good qualifications and are able to represent the people.”

Ahmad Zahri, 64, advised voters to look at the backgrounds of the contenders vying for the relevant posts in the election before casting their ballots.

“This year’s party election serves as a true test of the democratisation process for Umno,” he said, stressing that delegates must make full use of their vote to ensure that the candidates they selected had proven leadership qualities.

Veteran Datuk Rahmah Abdul Hamid, 81, has found “experience” an important factor to consider when choosing the right candidate.

“Anybody looking to be elected into office should have served the party, starting out at the lower ranks,” she said, while voicing her disappointment at the entrance of Kedah Menteri Besar Datuk Mukhriz Mahathir into the vice-presidency race.

“While I have nothing against him, I feel that Mukhriz has been pushed far too quickly up the ranks. He has not even served as division leader yet.

“Umno works religiously from ground to the top and if you have not spent time building the party or being a coolie, then you will not understand the sentiments of party members.”

She said Mukhriz should instead spend his time focusing on Kedah and get accepted by the people there first.

She pointed out that, in contrast, incumbent vice-president (Datuk Seri) Hishammuddin Hussein had his foot on the ground and knew the party’s ins and outs.

“He has been the Umno youth chief before, and he has moved up the ladder in a proper way, being groomed by the party.”

She also gave credit to vice-presidential candidates Tan Sri Isa Samad and Datuk Seri Mohd Ali Rustam, saying both had their share of experience.

There you go. Just like in the previous article entitled “Buruk ketuanya, buruklah pengikutnya”, it was written that:

“… just a stark reminder to those who want to ridicule other people – please look at the non-accomplishments of your Ketua Pemuda first before criticising others.”

And the NST article above is a perfect example how a mother of Ketua Pemuda should not criticise other people without being cognisant of her son’s own position.

In fact from another perspective, if the mother had said this before the Umno wings’ elections, it could dent the candidacy the incumbent Ketua Pemuda!

‘Ibarat percik air dalam dulang, terpercik muka sendiri’.

She said, “Anybody looking to be elected into office should have served the party, starting out at the lower ranks,”.

Did her own son the Ketua Pemuda started out from the lower ranks? He was a nobody but was pushed far too quickly up the ranks and became the Deputy Youth Head uncontested at the age of 28 just because his father in law was the sitting Umno President at that time.

She further said, “I feel that Mukhriz has been pushed far too quickly up the ranks. He has not even served as division leader yet.”

Touchè.

Was his son even a division head when he became Ketua Pemuda Umno in 2009? Mind you, Ketua Pemuda Umno is also one of the Vice Presidents in Umno hierarchy.

Lastly, she criticised Mukhriz Mahathir by saying:

“Umno works religiously from ground to the top and if you have not spent time building the party or being a coolie, then you will not understand the sentiments of party members.”

Where did his son served as a coolie of Umno to understand the sentiment of party members? In Kuwait? In Oxford? In Singapore?

Where makcik?

All the people in the Ketua Pemuda’s camp suffers dementia where they feel the need to criticise others with criticisms which incidentally reflect the inadequacies of that same Ketua Pemuda!

It is unfortunate that the Ketua Pemuda uses his mother to criticise a VP candidate. Where the VP post shouldn’t even be of concern to the Ketua Pemuda. The Ketua Pemuda should just focus on Pemuda Umno. Why bother poking his dirty nose on other people’s career?

But knowing him and his childish and petty ambition to smear anyone who will derail his ambition to become the eventual Prime Minister, his modus operandi had stoop ever so low.

This is in fact the opposite of the ‘semangat setiakawan’ he extols.

It is appropriate for his mother to tell Umno to ‘choose competent leaders’. Fullstop. But to lambast Mukhriz for rising up the ranks to quickly is highly irregular considering her own son’s unfair advantage towards others for the past 9 years.

And obviously it is highly inappropriate for NST to even publish this shoddy piece of journalism. None of the other so called veterans in the article above mentioned any names of the candidates. But somehow a veteran (?) Umno woman who happens to be the Ketua Pemuda’s mother had no qualms to mudsling a candidate in public and NST had the audacity to let it print.

Now the underdog had so much work to do. Considering all government’s media is actively trying to realise the ambition of one young arrogant leader who suffers misplaced sense of self-entitlement and jealousy.

We don’t count on Mukhriz to win this weekend with all this ungentlemanly conduct by people with no class.

____________________

Blogger Big Dog wrote THIS as well.

The illogic of a liberal and progressive UMNO

Here is an article written by a commentator:

_______________________________________________________________________

The illogic of a liberal and progressive UMNO – Part I

By Ramayana

The recent statement by UMNO’s new Ketua Pemuda (who is also the old Ketua Pemuda, of course) defies logic. And that drives me nuts. Enough to make me put finger to keyboard and write something so that people can see just how nonsensical it is. And how nonsensical Pemuda UMNO has become.

Yes. The Emperor-in-waiting has no clothes, and this is why:

1. Ketua Pemuda is quoted as saying, in Pemuda UMNO’s official mouthpiece, that his win was a sign that UMNO wants to be more progressive and liberal. In other words, that UMNO wants to be like him and his big boss. Yet, the recent elections suggest this approach makes no sense:

a. If the Malay majority had indeed wanted a more liberal and progressive leadership, surely they would have voted for PKR and/or PAS en masse at GE13? Why didn’t they?

b. Instead, they turned around and gave UMNO an even bigger win this time. Why? Was it because at that moment they saw UMNO as a more progressive and liberal Malay party?

c. Is this then to be taken as a sign that the majority of Malays wants UMNO to become more progressive and liberal? If so, we wonder how these folks read roadsigns.

2. Related to that: it’s not just the Ketua Pemuda who makes the mistake, but these days almost everyone on top in UMNO, too – I loathe to use the term “UMNO leadership” because at present time they are showing anything but. They confidently proclaim that the reason why the Malays turned and gave UMNO a bigger majority was because – get this – the majority Malays accepted and endorsed Agenda Transformasi that UMNO brings through its president President (if you get what I mean).

I got a one word response to that. Unfotunately, it is unprintable.

a. We have to ask the President and his deluded minions: if that is supposed to be a sign that the Malay majority wants UMNO’s Agenda Transformasi, what does it say about the 95% Chinese voters who soundly REJECTED it?

b. Why continue with an agenda that is accepted only by 55% of the electorate, and soundly rejected in the urban areas?

No need to answer the rhetorical questions because we all know that the present stand – “Melayu sokong dan mahu Agenda Transformasi UMNOOOOO!” – is just a classic “cover line”, to use the popular Malay term.

The delusional belief stems from an effort to save the UMNO President’s self esteem that got whacked kaw-kaw at the recent elections. Despite the greatness of his Agenda Transformasi, 95% of the Chinese who were supposedly eating out of his hands rejected BN/UMNO. Who can forget the face of the BN/UMNO President the day after the results were announced? Terkulat-kulat sampai tak tahu nak duduk atau nak berdiri. Priceless. But then, just a few months on, he has found a way to excuse his bad performance, and is now back to his arrogant self.

Delusions is what you get when you hang out with the rakyat to watch footie on teevee only in Bangsar and Subang Jaya. Go down la to the various Uptowns and Downtowns and see what is really going on the minds of the REAL Melayu who are UMNO’s constituents. Then maybe you would know – as we on the outside already know clearly and without any doubt – the over-riding reason why the Malay masses turned to UMNO during the last elections.

3. Ketua Pemuda declares that he wants to make UMNO more centrist. WTF. UMNO _is_ centrist. This has been covered elsewehere, so I will keep it short:

The extremists are PAS and DAP, both extreme parties that are trying desperately – and succeeding – to cover line their extremism.

UMNO has always been centrist: UMNO’s policies – despite repeated attempts to paint them as negative, even by its own Ketua Pemuda – benefit everyone equally, if not favouring more towards the nons. Even with the NEP, when Malays get government contracts, they bring these jobs to suppliers – who make up the vast majority of these suppliers? The NEP succeeded in creating a huge Malay middle class – who benefits from this huge market made up of almost 70% of the nation’s population?

The illogic of a liberal and progressive UMNO – Part II

4. Again, we start by querying the logic: WTF do you want to turn UMNO into PKR for? Offering the same shit as the other side? Where is your USP then? The Malay noobs who want to be liberal and progressive, they should just go vote for PKR. Which in fact, was what they did.

a. But hang on. Excuse me, didn’t UMNO itself say that the majority of the Malay male youth voted BN/UMNO in GE13? So where’s the problem, yo?

b. You think by doing a PKR you would out-PKR PKR? How is that logical?

The analogy is of a nasi lemak seller who becomes an overnight success. So the very next day what happens? A new nasi lemak seller opens up a stall. Right next to the incumbent nasi lemak seller. Familiar story, innit? Who would have thought that Pemuda UMNO wanted a Ketua Pemuda who has the mentality of a jealous nasi lemak seller?

To put it another way: when you go and ape Apple, you are doomed to be stuck in Apple’s shadow. Nothing you come out with will ever be better than an iPad because, hell, iPad is Apple. Solution: offer something that is not an iPad. Like Android. And a company whose philosophy is not Apple’s. Like Google. See, you _can_ offer an alternative and still be cool.

You just need to, I dunno, think. Innovate, rather than copy. And here we thought innovation was the in-thing du jour of Bapak Presiden.

Create a new category, the way Apple had created a new category jugak dulu. When people offer A, you offer B. That’s logical. That’s a real alternative. When people offer A, you ejaculate in your pants and hurriedly turn the ship’s wheels around to offer A as well. When it is not even yet proven – as we have seen from the GE13 results – that 60% of the masses want the philosophy that A has. WTF is that if not insanity?

5. Related to that: one, in GE13 95% Chinese went out to vote vs 55% Malay/Bumis, yet UMNO still won. What does that say? Two, stats I have come across suggest the Malay youth under 30 mainly voted for BN. What does that say?

The logical thing to do would have been to strengthen your existing base. AND THEN you go look for new markets. At that time you can use your Bapak Presiden’s favourite Blue Ocean strategy – might as well, right, since you already paid millions for it.

Where is the logic of going for new markets before consolidating your existing one? Pre-assuming – based on denials and false assumptions – what your current market wants? That’s why perhaps after graduating from a prestigious alma mater the proper thing to do would have been to look for a job rather than a well-connected soulmate to marry. Masuk wataniah, jadi model majalah, ada dapat bayaran yang contribute kepada income Melayu naik to First World levels ke, dik.

6. The Malays have to change in order to compete in this new world. I agree wholeheartedly. But at what cost?

a. Do we need to be like others and become ultra-kiasu just to compete with them?

b. Do we have to set our religious principles aside in order to become successful?

We Malays have our set of principles, we have our way of life. At least in this country we could still create an environment where we can live the way we want to live.

So why are we dancing to the tune of others when it is we – who form 67% of the population – who should be the ones beating the gendang – not drum, ye Bapak Presiden, no need to get excited – for others to dance to?

This is UMNO’s role and responsibility. To create that environment for the majority of Malays. But it doesn’t want to do that. Instead it wants to become exotic little creatures that everyone would coo and ahh to, massive exercises of ego-massaging for people with low self esteem and such desperately low self confidence in their own capabilities that they need a battalion of advisors.

The question we majority Malays are left with at the end of the day is this:

If UMNO becomes “liberal dan progresif”, where are we majority Malays who are “tradisionalis dan konservatif” supposed to turn to? We already _have_ a traditionalist and conservative Malay party: it’s called UMNO.

Those who crave to be liberal and progressive should just decamp to PKR. Why are you still in UMNO?

END

The Liberal Ketua Pemuda

It’s good that the Ketua Pemuda admits he is liberal. He had never admitted it before and in the previous article, we just labelled him as such only due to his affinity towards doing something unorthodox and non traditional. We half expected him to say that he is at most, a modernist.

Meaning, trying to modernise Umno and strengthen it by adapting with the change of times. But never a liberal. We dangled the word because his policies and speeches often mimicked the self proclaimed liberals in DAP and PKR. Here is the true meaning of the word liberal in its political sense:

1) Not bound by orthodox tenets or established forms in political or religious philosophy; independent in opinion; not conservative; friendly to great freedom in the constitution or administration of government; having tendency toward democratic or republican, as distinguished from monarchical or aristocratic, forms; as, liberal thinkers..

2) One who favors greater freedom in political or religious matters; an opponent of the established systems

So there you go.

Now we are certain that he is indeed, a liberal.

By the way, do you know why Ketua Pemuda Umno no longer care about the court ruling involving the Allah issue? Precisely because he is now liberal.

As at this time (2pm), no tweets were forthcoming from the Ketua Pemuda. Only his non-Umno minions are busy lambasting the court ruling.

The focus now is no longer about religion or even race (that letter M in UMNO used to mean something). Besides, if he is seen as being too much gung-ho on anything about his agama and bangsa, might not sit well with his liberal friends outside Umno. That will only make him less popular.

The focus now is about liberalism and to a greater extent, how to use this liberal agenda to gain further support for his political career from outside Barisan Nasional. Grassroots Pemuda Umno do not really understand the word ‘liberal’ in its political context.  Just maybe, even the Ketua Pemuda does not understand the history behind the word ‘liberal’.

When Pemuda Umno see their Ketua Pemuda as popular and even gets positive remarks from people within Pakatan Rakyat, they then feel that they must vote him at all costs. Maybe in the future Umno will get more votes from Pakatan Rakyat fans -just because he is popular. What Pemuda Umno know is just what they see. Not what they think.

The Ketua Pemuda will just follow the hottest trend of the day. That’s why sometimes he regressed on his words and does an about turn on a lot of things just to pander towards a more popular sentiment. For all these self-promoting actions, only a trained mind will able to discern them in the next couple of years. The oblivious Umno members will just be like rats being led by the pied piper.

“Buruk ketuanya, buruklah pengikutnya”

For the past couple of weeks there have been no articles regarding the upcoming Umno elections in this blog. It was on purpose because this Umno election, well at least to the opinion of this blogger will not see much change. Whether specifically on the line-up or generally on Umno itself.

We can bet, after the winners have been announced and the confetti being swept away clean, and after the party president gave an arousing speech that the new (more or less) line-up will pave way for a new and re-energised Umno, the party will revert to its old ways of doing things.

This blog tried to stay away from commenting on the candidates because honestly, there are bigger things to ponder about.

But when a known stooge of the incumbent Ketua Pemuda unfairly ridiculed the father of an Umno Vice President candidate through his tweets, then this blog just had to say something about him and his boss – the Ketua Pemuda. Something along the line – ‘kokok berderai-derai, ekor bergelumang tahi’.

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Obviously trying to mock Tun Mahathir and his son

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Obtusely disparaging Tun Dr Mahathir

Since the Ketua Pemuda and his lackeys have no due regards towards the older generation and had extensively in every turn tried to denigrate the grand old man in very way possible, let us then write something about the Ketua Pemuda just to remind his pack of mongrels to look in the mirror first before poking their noses where they don’t belong.

First off, we begin with these few paragraphs which were written back in November 2008:

Since 2004, Umno is permeated with a culture of being ‘biadap’ to its illustrious former president. This culture of running down their own former leader was one of the factor Umno lost the support from many of its own members.

When Pak Lah and followers were rude to Tun Dr Mahathir, many were turned off by their diatribe. The 4th floor boys were working overtime in discrediting Tun Dr Mahathir. Even NST, Umno’s own newspaper were used to criticise the grand old man. An astute blogger, Datuk Sakmongkol had succinctly put it in a few words;

“The present administration is distinguished in its feverish attempts to discredit as much as possible the legacy of Tun Dr Mahathir. Hence the open ended freedom to strike and assassinate given to political storm troopers like Obergruppenfuhrer Musa Hitam, the purveyor of the term elegant silence plus the barking Rottweilers and Dobermans like Nazri Aziz, Sabry Cheek, Azalina Othman, Ismail Sabri, Zaid Ibrahim, Zaid Hamidi and the man who claimed to be primus inter pares- Shahrir ‘the silverback’ Samad.”

Summarily, they still do not realise their mistake. This barrage of criticisms prolonged even after the general election.

When Samy Vellu was criticising Tun, where were the Umno Youth wing to defend their own leader? Again, as aptly said by Datuk Sakmongkol in one of his earlier writings;

“When Tun Dr Mahathir was his boss, Samy Vellu did not find anything wrong with Tun Mahathir. In fact, Samy Vellu was the greatest apple polisher Tun Mahathir had. Indeed sometimes Samy was more Mahathir that Tun himself. Who shall ever forget, Samy’s act of filial devotion by hand feeding Tun Mahathir with a Deepavali morsel?

Meanwhile in UMNOland, it was All Quiet On The Western Front. Not a single UMNO leader defended their one time president. This man was the UMNO president for 22 years. Their dreadful and shameless behaviour confirms my belief that all these UMNO leaders must be resign en bloc from their MKT positions. If they cannot defend their own leader, how can we ever hope they will protect us? Let the UMNO electorate now judge you.”

With this kind of scenario, I am surprised that Khairy Jamaluddin still do not get it. When many of his underlings in the form of pro KJ blogs are condemning Tun left right and centre, one left to wonder if he could really learn any lesson.

Until now, there is one question that can never be answered comprehensively by KJ and his followers.

“What was the basis, the merit and the reason that enable KJ to be elected unopposed to the post of Deputy Umno Youth Head of Malaysia in 2004?”

And yet, he and his bloggers have no qualms in ridiculing Tun in the blogosphere. In their effort of criticising their political rival Datuk Mukhriz, the only modus operandi of these cyber troopers resort to is to question Mukhriz’s pedigree and his father’s.

I cannot help but to be amused with this. Because, if I were to take the same route, I can also compare Tun with KJ’s own father in law in the process. A feat I would happily relish.

Since they assume that today, Tun Dr. Mahathir is protecting and promoting his son, let’s go down memory lane and read this:

Back in 2009 during the pervious Umno election, the current Ketua Pemuda was caught by the Disciplinary Board of Umno but was able to continue on despite the money politics charges. It was written:

Datuk Seri Mohd Ali Rustam

Verdict : GUILTY

Action : BARRED FROM CONTESTING

Khairy Jamaluddin

Verdict : GUILTY

Action : STILL ABLE TO CONTEST

Datuk Seri Mohd Khir Toyo

Verdict : CLEARED OF ANY WRONG DOING

Action : STATUS QUO

My take? It will be interesting to see whether Umno Youth delegates would still want to vote a candidate that was deemed guilty of money politics. Umno disciplinary board had made mockery of all Umno members. I can imagine the headlines should KJ wins the contest next week:

“KJ BECOMES UMNO YOUTH CHIEF DESPITE BEING GUILTY OF MONEY POLITICS”

Can anyone takes a guess how did the son in law of the Prime Minister at that time could be let off so easily even after being caught in money politics? The only possible explanation is because he had blatantly said time and time again that he will use the protection from his father in law to attain his ambition.

He actually said:

“There’s a certain extent (to which) these people in Umno will not go after me. So it gives me ‘protection’ to change things. 

“If I don’t use this ‘protection’ to change things for the better, then I’m just wasting time and marking my time to go up the ladder of politics. That’s not what I am about.

“I want to use this time that I have while I have this ‘protection’ to change things, to change Umno for the better,” he said yesterday during a question-and-answer session at the Kancil Awards Festival Speakers series.

Yes, he is not about to wait his time and patiently and slowly go up the ladder of hierarchy like other people. He unashamedly said that he will USE his position as son-in-law to change things! But judging from what we can see for the past 9 years, Umno didn’t become better. The only changes we have seen is him, promoting himself and going up the leadership hierarchy in record time – just like what he said he would.

And yet, the underlings, those sycophants of this Ketua Pemuda had the gall to tell us that he is where he is now because of his own merit?!

These yes-men must have gone full retard!

The only reason why he is in the race as Ketua Pemuda back in 2009 was because he won unopposed as its deputy in 2004. That is not merit. That is nepotism.

The reason he became Ketua Pemuda was because the Disciplinary Board of Umno felt that it needs to give protection to a corrupt candidate guilty of money politics, which of course he won the race.

In 2008, Barisan Nasional did not get the majority votes from the youth. In 2013, Barisan Nasional fared even worse than in 2008 with the majority of youths again, did not vote for Barisan Nasional. Now what have Ketua Pemuda Umno and BN Youth Chairman had to say about that?

Well in not so many words he said – I have fulfilled my KPI and must be made a minister. Again, that misplaced arrogance and misguided sense of self-entitledment.

The reason he became a minister is because he is the Ketua Pemuda Umno. That’s it.

The only thing that was accomplished by him is that he is now loved by the leaders from Pakatan Rakyat. All the Barisan Nasional Youth Fair, all the BN Job Fair and all his other initiatives he had concocted, did all those manage to gain votes from the youth? Of course it didn’t. Otherwise BN could have gained a few more seats. What it did gain is increase of his popularity.

In other words, BN Youth Wing and Umno Youth Wing do not understand the basics of voters’ mentality. Even from his speeches, the Ketua Pemuda is way off tangent in understanding the basics of Umno’s raison d’etre.  His political speeches once suffered a few criticism from yours truly and a few bloggers.

The problem with this Ketua Pemuda is that he wasn’t brought up within the ambient of Umno’s struggle. Most of his life, he spent it away from this country. He can be termed as liberal and somewhat progressive. The only reason why he is even in Umno is because that is where the power lies. And with power, comes the many forms of benefits such as – twitter toadies.

It is not a sin to be liberal and progressive. The only problem is the apparent dichotomy of being liberal philosophically but trapped in a right wing party.

And when you surround yourself with like-minded liberals as your groupies, then it takes a toll in your reputation from within the party. Although being thick skinned is this particular Ketua Pemuda’s trademark, being wise is certainly not.

This Ketua Pemuda wants to be liberal in Umno and be looked upon as liberal in national politics as well.

Therein lies the problem and the central theme on why he is not trusted by most grassroot Umno members.

The Ketua Pemuda of Umno must always be seen as the protector of malay rights and the Constitution. This must be seen even in national stage and beyond. For if the Ketua Pemuda is too liberal and is friendly towards the enemies of malay rights and the Constitution (like how he as successfully achieved), then any speeches he made within Umno’s context is deemed as hypocritical.

You cannot be a left wing at national level but right wing at party levels. It just doesn’t make sense. That would be called, playing to the gallery.

Many still remember this:

Forked tongue

We usually will never trust liars

And what is worse about this Ketua Pemuda, he changes tact at a drop of the hat. At one time he kissed the keris to protect the malay rights when he made speeches during a party assembly, but at certain times, he wants to make Umno more centrist.

Confused much?

Now if at national level Umno is being attacked from all corners, who is there to protect the malay rights and it’s position in the Constitution? The liberal Minister of Youth and Sports? Or the sometimes conservative, sometimes centrist but most of the times confused Ketua Pemuda?

The right way to do things as an Umno leader in this multiracial country is to be right wing at national level (nationalistic, patriotic, protecting the Constitution, defending malay rights) but be very strong in advocating progress in the thinking of Umno members (malays must be progressive, must not rely on the crutches forever, must attain meritocracy etc). That way Umno as a party will progress and yet its position at national level is defended.

You can’t be both liberals at national level AND at party levels.

Currently we have one Prime Minister who tries to inculcate moderation and liberal ideas at national front but during Umno assembly, made fiery remarks on how he will protect malay rights.

It doesn’t makes sense for the 3 million Umno members.

His actions in launching damning initiatives towards the malay agenda since 2009 did not help his cause. That is why when he recently announced a few policies to help the bumiputera community last month, it was immediately deemed as pandering towards the upcoming Umno elections. Thank God (for him) that he was unchallenged. Therefore, there could be a risk that those policies will not be pursued with vigour after all.

And we also do not understand why this Ketua Pemuda has this nonsensical urge to spew rhetoric:

Khairy Jamaluddin, who looks set to be returned unopposed as Umno Youth chief, will use his second term to cultivate a more centrist approach for the wing that has traditionally been a pressure group.

He said that being vocal in expressing right-wing sentiment in defending the interests of the party was no longer appropriate.

“I am trying to change the DNA of Umno Youth from being mostly right-wing and Malay-centric to a more centrist wing that focuses on issues and their solutions,” Khairy said in an interview.

Will focussing on issues and solutions brings back votes from the youth to Barisan Nasional and Umno? What are the examples of Pemuda Umno focussing on issues and providing solutions that had gained majority flocks of votes into the fold of Barisan Nasional in the last general election?

Before this article gets too carried away, just a stark reminder to those who want to ridicule other people – please look at the non-accomplishments of your Ketua Pemuda first before criticising others.

Some of this yes-men of the Ketua Pemuda may argue that this blog is trying to ‘bodek’ Tun Dr. Mahathir. But unlike the Ketua Pemuda, Tun Dr. Mahathir has no say in the government and has no powers in Umno. He only has his words and charisma.  There is nothing to gain by defending Tun Dr. Mahathir. This is done just by the sheer respect he commands.

Not many leaders have that capability. Most people only command respect when they are in the position of power. Something most Umno leaders past and present often forgot.

This is not an article to dent the chances of the Ketua Pemuda to retain his seat. We have no doubt that he will win with a big margin. He has done that before in 2009 and he will do it again. Umno members especially the Pemuda have no ability to discern between what is good and what is bad for them anyway. This article is just for the lackeys of Ketua Pemuda and hopefully they remember the kind of person they are supporting. There is actually nothing to be proud of. Like some old wise men always say “Buruk ketuanya buruk lah pengikutnya. Pengikut kurang ajar, pemimpin hilang maruah”.

Just as mentioned at the start of this article, this wouldn’t have been written if it’s not because of a few uncouth people.

Pak Lah : Awakening the bad memories

I wrote this paragraph about Khairy Jamaluddin in an article (do read it again, thank you) a couple of months back:

There is also this principle that one must always use in politics. When the enemy hates you, you are doing the right thing. But when your political enemy is loving you, then something is indeed wrong. 

Therefore, when the opposition leaders, no less than Anwar Ibrahim had lavished praises to Pak Lah over the purported publication of ‘Awakening: The Abdullah Badawi Years in Malaysia’ we will certainly have to take a closer look at what that implies.

Not to mention the fact that book itself will be launched by none other than Nurul Izzah, the daughter of Umno’s nemesis. Nurul Izzah’s presence for the book launch is an obvious symbolism that the book itself has the blessings of Anwar Ibrahim.

Is there anything else to be said in this matter?

Let us read what the main culprit had to say:

KENYATAAN MEDIA Y.A.BHG TUN ABDULLAH HAJI AHMAD BADAWI

Sejak dua tiga hari yang lepas, banyak berita diterbit mengenai ‘buku Pak Lah’. Isu ini juga mendapat liputan luas dalam media sosial dengan pelbagai reaksi dan komen. Sebelum saya memberi apa-apa komen, mungkin saya perlu memberi sedikit penjelasan tentang buku tersebut.

Pertamanya, buku tersebut tidak ditulis oleh saya. Buku ini disusun oleh dua ahli akademik, James Chin dan Bridget Welsh, dengan memuatkan beberapa rencana oleh pelbagai penulis yang telah menyumbangkan tulisan masing-masing mengenai pentadbiran saya sebagai Perdana Menteri. Ada yang dikhabarkan positif dan banyak juga yang negatif dan kritikal.

Kedua, saya sendiri hanya terlibat melalui wawancara yang dibuat oleh James Chin dan Bridget Welsh. Wawancara ini lebih kepada menjawab soalan-soalan yang dibangkitkan oleh penulis-penulis yang telah menyumbang kepada buku tersebut dan memberi saya ruang untuk menjelaskan beberapa perkara dari sudut saya sendiri.

Ketiga, saya tidak menaja atau meminta buku tersebut diterbitkan. Sudah menjadi perkara biasa para akademik membuat analisa tentang sejarah politik negara kita dan sudah pasti era saya tidak terlepas dari kajian ilmiah. Saya cuma telah setuju untuk diwawancara agar suara, pendapat serta penjelasan saya dapat dimuatkan didalam buku tersebut.

Keempat, oleh kerana saya bukan penerbit, pencetak, pengarang ataupun penulis buku tersebut, saya tidak tahu, tidak diberitahu dan tidak bertanggungjawab diatas mana-mana jemputan untuk melancarkan atau membincangkan buku tersebut. Berita yang mengatakan pemimpin dari parti pembangkang dijemput untuk melancarkan buku ini di Singapura – kalaupun benar – adalah keputusan penerbit buku, bukan saya.

Kelima, saya tidak merancang untuk menghadiri pelancaran buku tersebut. Ini kerana saya tidak mahu orang membuat andaian yang buku ini ditulis atau ditaja oleh saya. Saya cuma menjawab soalan yang ditanya. Biarlah jawapan-jawapan saya menjadi tumpuan pembaca.

Berlatarbelakangkan fakta-fakta diatas, saya berharap orang awam mendapat gambaran yang lebih jelas tentang ‘buku Pak Lah’. Sekali lagi, ini bukan buku yang ditulis atau ditaja oleh saya. Mungkin ada yang bertanya, kenapa Pak Lah setuju untuk diwawancara oleh pengarang-pengarang yang dikatakan selalu menulis rencana yang kritikal? Saya bersetuju diwawancara kerana perlu ada penjelasan saya sendiri didalam kajian ilmiah ini. Suka atau tidak, setuju atau tidak, saya berpegang kepada prinsip keterbukaan sebagai paksi kepada demokrasi yang matang. Prinsip keterbukaan inilah yang saya amalkan apabila didatangi dengan permohonan oleh para pengarang buku ini untuk diwawancara. Walaupun saya dimaklumkan buku ini bakal memuatkan rencana yang kritis dan ‘unflattering’ tentang kepimpinan saya, saya masih setuju diwawancara atas semangat keterbukaan demi perdebatan yang seimbang dengan mengambil kira semua sudut pandangan.

Sudah pasti pandangan-pandangan dalam buku ini akan mengundang reaksi-reaksi tertentu. Terpulanglah kepada semua pihak untuk membuat rumusan masing-masing. Prinsip keterbukaan bermaksud kita sedia memberi ruang kepada semua untuk bersuara. Tetapi janganlah pula ada yang membuat andaian bahawa buku ini ditulis oleh Pak Lah yang sudah bersubahat dengan pembangkang untuk menentang partinya sendiri. Itu sudah memesong fakta dan menjadi fitnah. Apa juga teguran yang diberikan dalam wawancara saya yang dimuatkan dalam buku ini dibuat kerana saya ingin melihat UMNO terus diberikan mandat dan kepercayaan oleh rakyat. Saya tak pernah meninggalkan UMNO dan Insya’Allah bila tiba masanya nanti, saya akan menghembuskan nafas terakhir saya di dunia ini masih lagi sebagai ahli UMNO yang cintakan negaranya.

12 Ogos

First and foremost, it does not matter if this book was not written by Pak Lah himself. But the fact that he contributed his thinking in the form of specifically arranged interview session which in turn became the very first chapter of the book shows that it wasn’t just a case of ‘saya tidak menaja atau meminta buku tersebut diterbitkan’. Surely an agreement should have been made to ensure that he will be indemnified by the publisher should litigation suits were brought forward against him. Surely proper controls and mechanism have been made in order to publish a book which is beyond reproach and above suspicion.

What is more important is the fact that Pak Lah should have the awareness that this book might be used against Umno by the opposition leaders. Sure enough, you can see Anwar Ibrahim squeezing every ounce of it with glee. It is good to have ‘semangat keterbukaan‘. But intelligent people should know that there is time and place for such ‘keterbukaan’. The last time he wanted to have this sort of thing, he lost 5 states and for the first time in history, the two thirds majority in Parliament.

If there is such written publishing agreement then surely there is a clause inserted by his team that the publisher must not let the book be exploited by politicians especially from the opposition in order to further their cause. The fact that Nurul Izzah is launching it proves that a) the opposition is politicising it and b) there is no such clause.

The inability to look further beyond the nose is a stark reminder of how ill-equipped and poor Pak Lah was as a Prime Minister. It is like the skillset did not match the job scope. Some people can wing it. Some will thrive in it. But most fail miserably.  Today, we are living in his mess.

And he probably did more damage to himself and also to his son in law’s reputation within the party by using this opportunity to run with a pack of opposition figures.

Since the first chapter is a rebuttal of whatever criticisms being hurled (if any) by other writers in the subsequent chapters, then it will be opened to further criticisms and a trip down memory lane.

Already Terence Netto, a pro-opposition writer had written about it -

Here Abdullah missed out on a good opportunity to shed necessary perspective on a matter that dogs almost all serving politicians: how to counter the inevitable public perception of bias when the powerful are blood relations to underlings seen as wielding undue influence?

Abdullah’s response – conveyed in reflections that appear in a compilation of assessments of his premiership titled “Awakening: the Abdullah Badawi Years in Malaysia” – is flat denial that Khairy wielded “undue influence” on him in the five years and five months he was premier.

It was against this background of Abdullah’s vacillation on police reform that Khairy Jamaluddin’s transition from political novice to powerful presence behind the scenes took place.

The grapevine began to buzz with stories of Khairy’s influence on major decisions and even of his interference with the civil service.

Exasperatingly, Abdullah mixed vacillation over police reform with deafness to the need to decisively demonstrate that Khairy was not a power behind the scenes.

Khairy increasingly became a target of criticism even as public disappointment mounted against Abdullah over the latter’s dithering on reform.

It is disingenuous on Abdullah’s part to now say that Khairy had no “undue influence” on him. As well believe Wanita Umno leader Shahrizat Jalil when she contended that she had nothing to do with the scandalous way in which a national cattle breeding project was managed by a company run by her husband and children.

Pak Lah’s simple flat out denial in the book that Khairy had vast influence in his administration reminded us about an interview he made in 2006 denying that his son Kamal Abdullah had received any contracts from the government. A simple discovery later revealed that Scomi, a company which his son has a lot of interests in at that time, received huge contracts from Petronas and in other companies. Some of them are:

1. In March, The Malay Mail reported that KTM had in 2005 awarded a five-year RM50 million contract to Scomi Group ‘to overhaul and maintain’ as many as 1,000 wagons.

2. Also in March, Business Times reported that Scomi Group was going to submit a bid for a RM120 million contract ‘to make body parts for about 400 buses for state-owned Syarikat Prasarana Negara Bhd’. Which they eventually won.

3. In April, The Edge reported that Scomi Engineering Bhd is acquiring a 51% stake in MTrans Transportation Systems Sdn Bhd for RM30 million to provide it a platform to be a key player in urban transportation.

4. Scomi Marine Bhd received a letter of intent from TNB Fuel Services Sdn Bhd for a coal shipment contract for three years from Oct 1, with an option to extend for another two years, the company said. Scomi Marine announced to Bursa Malaysia on April 14 that under the contract, it would be required to transport 500,000 tonnes (with 20% variation) of coal from Australia, Indonesia and South Africa yearly. It said TNB Fuel Services would determine the actual quantity of coal to be transported and from which country upon finalisation of the contract, The Edge reported.

5. Also recently, Scomi Group Bhd, an oil services company, won a contract from Petronas Carigali (Turkmenistan) Sdn Bhd to provide drilling fluids and other services for exploration works in Block 1, offshore Turkmenistan.\

- Source

In this particular matter, he actually lied in a live TV interview!

There were more lies and examples of ineptitude which he had made throughout his career as the PM. Did anyone remember him saying on 13th February 2008 that the Parliament will not be dissolved? But he made an about turn and dissolved the Parliament on the very next day that he earlier confirmed won’t be dissolved! What kind of clowning deceit was he trying to do? A stupid one of course.

When the leader lies to the rakyat and doing stupid things, obviously the cabinet ministers will do the same. Anyone remember back in May 2008 his cabinet assured the rakyat that there will be no increase in petrol prices till September? Well, they increased it 78 sen to RM2.70 in August!

That was the single biggest jump in fuel price ever recorded in our history. To make matters worse, his minister said that they wanted to make a 50 sen increase but decided on 78 sen because they do not want to increase it twice later on. Wasn’t that a galactically stupid decision? In the mean time, the rakyat suffered inflation and all kinds of repercussions.

Back in 2007, he also quashed rumours that he had remarried but soon afterwards, it was revealed he was indeed married a few weeks before that. Talk about a natural born liar.

There were many many more mistimed and ill-advised decisions which were made during his time as Prime Minister. One of the biggest mistakes they made is the decision to create Iskandar Corridor in Johor. Many parties had warned his administration that opening up lands for sale to foreigners particularly Singaporeans will create damaging implications to the state of Johor.

Currently, the Menteri Besar of Johor is having headaches on how to curb the spiralling home property prices and how to curb influx of foreigners gaining properties there. All these negative implications have detrimental effects on the locals there particularly the malays; the largest BN vote bank in Johor.

But to the Fourth Floor boys at that time, wealth and quick money coming out of it was more important.

And the fact that he revealed he had a sleeping disorder called ‘sleep apnea’ which made him dozed off during meetings is prove that he indeed, was sleeping on his job. A responsible leader would have turned down the offer. But he felt that having power is more honourable than embarrassing the nation when pictures of him sleeping during meetings and public assemblies were circulating in media all over the world.

But miraculously, he revealed that his sleeping disorder was cured after he had stepped down. The fact that the illness could be cured easily is testament that all this was just an excuse. He was indeed irresponsible and had laid too much importance on other people to run this country.

Back then the monicker and popular phrases people had associated with him were – The Sleeping PM, Kerajaan Tiga Beranak, UnderLah Pak Lah etc’

Now this is the type of Prime Minister which after 2009, all the opposition leaders love to compliment. Even now all of them are heaping praises towards Pak Lah and his son in law, Khairy Jamaluddin. Again, when your political enemies are loving you, then something is indeed wrong. What sort of pact is going on here?

Shall we go back in time and read what Lim Kit Siang, had written about Pak Lah? You can read it here. Mind you that this is one of the ‘milder’ articles about our PM back then. Excerpt:

Abdullah should seriously find out why more and more people, including in government, the ruling coalition and the public, are talking in this vein about “a sleeping PM” when it was never said against the four previous Prime Ministers, Tunku Abdul Rahman, Tun Razak, Tun Hussein Onn and Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad in the first 46 years of Malaysian nationhood.

One could disagree with the first four Prime Ministers, whether on government policies, measures or specific issues, but no one would attribute it to lack of focus, attention or interest by the Prime Minister.

Unfortunately, under Abdullah’s premiership, more and more people are putting the blame for many of the ills in government and country on “a sleeping PM”, which has not been helped by several factors, including:

  • Abdullah’s trebling up as Minister for Internal Security and Minister for Finance when it is clear that he does not have the time nor temperament to be a full-time hands-on head for either Ministry.
  • His 83 overseas trips in 44 months as Prime Minister;
  • His “gate-keepers” at the “fourth-storey” in Putrajaya who have made the very personable Abdullah even more inaccessible to those who want to meet him when compared to his predecessor Tun Dr. Mahathir, who had the public image of being arrogant and haughty.

I have for instance stopped asking for an appointment with the Prime Minister after meeting him twice after the 2004 general election where he would invariably end each meeting with the polite standing offer to call on him whenever necessary. This was after my several requests to meet up with him were blocked by his “gatekeepers”.

I do not think Abdullah is aware as to who are asking to see him. In fact, I do not think Abdullah even reads or is informed of the gist of official letters written to him, for instance, my letter registering “strongest protest possible” to him on Tuesday at the most unsatisfactory reply to a parliamentary question in Malaysian parliamentary history which totally evaded the specific query posed — and the reply was in the name of the Prime Minister.

I do not think Abdullah has seen my “strongest possible protest” letter which had also asked for the missing answer to be furnished.

In contrast, I never had doubts that when I wrote a letter to Tun Dr. Mahathir when he was Prime Minister, it would be seen by him. There was one occasion when I wrote to Mahathir protesting against his public criticism of the DAP for not speaking up against the atrocities and genocide committed in Bosnia and Herzegovina, telling him why it was baseless and untrue as he was victim of the media blackout of DAP. I immediately received a terse one-paragraph apology from Mahathir!

Although I am Parliamentary Opposition Leader, I do not want talk that the country has a “sleeping PM” to continue, as this is not good whether for the people or the country internationally.

Secondly, he must re-assert authority as Prime Minister and ensure that he is in control of the “gate-keepers” in the “fourth storey of Putrajaya” and not being controlled by his gatekeepers.

So Lim Kit Siang, who are the gatekeepers? Are they still running around creating havoc in this country? Are they your friends now?

There are a lot more we can write here but the most important thing regarding the book is this – it is just an effort to change what really happened during his years as Prime Minister. 

- Ineptitude and stupidity are disguised as inability to reform Umno (Umno members are to be blamed here),

- Mismanagement and corruption of his cronies and family members are disguised as “Mahathir’s pet projects will make this country bankrupt”,

- Cronyism, nepotism and total control of mainstream media editors are disguised as ‘democratisation of society’,

- Wastage and unwise decisions are disguised as national projects,

- Dictatorial tendency where nobody within the party can criticise the Prime Minister is disguised as proponent of democracy  

Perhaps the best way to look into how easy people forget what had happened merely 10 years ago is from the tweet of one called Lokman Adam. In the effort to defend Pak Lah,  today he tweeted:

“Pak Lah pun pernah bawa kita menang besar PRU 2004, kita juga pernah hilang 2/3 tahun 2008.”

That is an erroneous statement. Pak Lah did not bring about the huge mandate in 2004. He wasn’t the main factor. He was barely 5 months into his term as the Prime Minister back then. What kind of reform has he done within that short space of time to garner such huge mandate? But the loss of 2008, yes we can attribute it mainly on him, judging from all the stinging vitriol by the opposition leaders as well as the rakyat’s loss of confidence in him. All those were resulted from his own undoing.

But of course, we have to forgive Lokman Adam because wasn’t even in Umno during that time as he was with Anwar Ibrahim in PKR. But now after he crossed over to Umno during Pak Lah’s reign and currently managed to become a Youth Exco, memory could be a little bit jarred.

There is no point defending the indefensible. It is a futile effort.

Nevertheless, people must remember what had really happened and since we could not rely on the opposition leaders to tell the truth about Pak Lah nor can we rely on the Umno Youth members in correcting the perception that this book could just be a pact between Pak Lah and the opposition, then we must use our own ability to search for the truth. Just use google and search its archives on all the happenings from 2004 to 2008.

This trip down the memory lane will make us re-live the nightmares.

The case of Khairy – won the social media, lost the votes

I want to applaud a blogger at the blogsite http://www.fatimahzuhri.blogspot.com for a really good article on history. As someone who is fascinated with the history subject, I can’t help but to agree with what the blogger Fatimah Zuhri had to say.

Below are some of the snippets of the said article – you can read the whole article (please do) by clicking the link I provided above. There are many more gems in the original article.

Open letter to Malaysian: Why do we need to learn history?

Dear Malaysians,

1. Today, the Prime Minister has appointed a controversial figure (let us name him Mr KJ) to become a Minister. Since we are living in a free and open democracy, please allow me to give my opinion on this appointment.

2. Firstly, I respect the Prime Minister prerogative in appointing his cabinet but that does not mean we should stay silent.

3. Exactly 30 years ago, a controversial bloke (let us called him Mr AI) was appointed as a full minister – Minister of Culture, Youth and Sports. He was appointed to this ministerial position after he defeated SK for the Youth Leader position the year before. He was also at that time a member of Parliament after winning the PP seat.

…..

5. AI was and still is considered the best in terms of oratory skill in Malaysian politics. Many of the world dictators are brilliant orator – Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini. Mao, etc . In Multi level marketing (MLM), you sell yourself and your product to get people attention. In Pasar Seni, fraudsters sells snake oil to get people attention and usually they will show documents and so called ‘evidence’ to get people attention.

Similarly, Mr KJ is also a good orator. He uses his academic credential as his testimonial. When someone try to criticize him, his supporters will throw the J-word. His products? When he first came to prominence, he was selling the Malay agenda as his product. He was so adamant of this agenda that one of his goons  provoked the then Youth Leader to show ‘the keris’. However, lately, he has change his tune and try to re-brand his product similar to what Mr AI did.

…..

7. It will be most interesting to see in the next couple of years how Mr KJ will use his position to influence the youth. My bet is that he will exactly do what Mr AI did when he was KBS and then later on, Education Minister. Back then, Mr AI abused his position to make himself an idol for the youth. Instead of promoting UMNO as a brand, he was promoting himself as the brand. This self-branding was continued in a large scale effort when he was appointed Minister of Education.

For the past 5 years, Mr KJ has done nothing as Youth Leader to improve the perception amongst the youth towards his party. Instead, he was busy promoting KJ as the brand, as a result he is considerably well-known in the social media world. This is just a sample of things to come.

…..

9. There is no such thing as new politics. Politics is old. When Mr AI was DPM, he used his minions in the mainstream media to project an aura of ‘greatness’. Mr KJ uses social media to project his ‘greatness’. At the end of the day, the objective and the desired result is still the same. Mr Prime Minister, you were with Mr AI since the Youth days, are you too blind to see that Mr KJ is exactly like him? I do understand it is politically suicidal if Mr KJ was not given a position since he has branded himself well especially amongst the youth. So in GE14, please put him in a mixed or Chinese majority seat in Klang Valley.

A pretty good read I reckon.

Which is all true nevertheless. When Khairy Jamaluddin was not selected to be in the cabinet in 2009 and was given the amanah by the Prime Minister to concentrate on the youth and get them to vote for Barisan Nasional, he did none of that.

Instead, he cultivated idol worshipping among the easily impressed younglings. Instead of getting the young voters to vote for Barisan Nasional, he stressed on his own public image. He created the Barisan Nasional Youth Volunteer fan club just to help elevate his brand. The Khairy 2.0 is what his sycophants had chanted back in 2009.

But in stark contrast, this Umno Youth leader never did get any new votes from the newly registered young voters nor any votes from the fence sitters below 40. Did Barisan Nasional as a whole get the majority of votes from voters below 40 years old?

Hence, the illusion that was created, the hype that has been bandied around that Khairy is a ‘rising star’ is exactly just that – a hype. When the twitter army created through BNYV and other groupies specifically tasked to bomb the social media with his ‘endeavours’ and ‘effort’, it didn’t translate into what the PM had hoped for.

Moreover, the social media unit of Umno Youth is more disjointed than ever with wrong strategies being placed. If Khairy had given more focus onto the Umno Youth wing, perhaps this could be avoided. But individualistic tendencies kept him focussed on his personal vehicle – the social media and the BNYV.

Just like how Anwar Ibrahim did with NST and Utusan back in the 90s, Khairy  is using the social media to further his political exploits. Up until Wednesday, that exploits went into viral when his minions pre-empted the PM himself by saying their leader may not be appointed as minister because a former premier is against it. As a result, out of the blue, the old man’s name was dragged into the social media ruckus.

njkvds

If Tun Mahathir wants to weaken the PM, he wouldn’t have campaigned tirelessly for him. And is KJ really pro-Najib?

Nevertheless, if their ‘exalted’ leader couldn’t get into the cabinet, the minions’ own future and potential benefits will look dim. And yet these are the same people who said, this is not the time for divisive personal interest.

How pathetic for some silly people to even drag a statesman into their own psywar just because they themselves are afraid of their own future. The statesman had been a minister for nearly 30 years and Prime Minister for 22 years and still, some wet behind the ear politician and his lackeys felt the need to vilify him? Just because he is afraid he couldn’t get to be a minister?

Please bear in mind it was only in early April he offered not to contest in GE13. Perhaps the article – drama or greed, would be the best read for this kind of situation.

But the fact of the matter is this – we need to be wary when history is repeating itself. From just plain observation, we can see that Khairy is not sincere in helping the party nor the coalition. Yes he revel himself in debates with opposition figures. But that is just to promote himself among the savvy youths. But did Barisan Nasional win more votes from the youth?

No.

In fact, the urban youths voted for Pakatan Rakyat.

There is also this principle that one must always use in politics. When the enemy hates you, you are doing the right thing. But when your political enemy is loving you, then something is indeed wrong.

In the case of Khairy, who can ever forget the fact that Rafizi Ramli invited him to join Pakatan Rakyat no less than 3 times during their debate in London last year!

Rafizi was practically begging Khairy to join Pakatan Rakyat!

And the latest incident, to the chagrin of many Barisan Nasional members and to the befuddlement of fence sitters, Lim Kit Siang complimented Khairy as if Khairy was the next best thing that came down from the celestial heavens.

Kit Siang wrote:

One criticism of the Cabinet announced by Najib yesterday is its distinct lack of “star” or “wow” quality.

The only person who stands head and shoulder over the rest of the Cabinet line-up in intellectual prowess is the Oxford graduate, UMNO Youth leader, Khairy Jamaluddin, but who had stepped on too many toes in his heyday as the son-in-law to Tun Abdullah in the brief period his father-in-law as the Prime Minister in Malaysia.

I had in fact had occasion to castigate Khairy in Parliament as the “richest unemployed youth in the world” when he was too big for his boots. I hope that in his many years in “wilderness” eating humble pie although he has UMNO Youth leader, conspicuously sidelined from government front-benches although his deputy was made Deputy Minister, have taught him the qualities of humility.

His final rehabilitation in being appointed to the Cabinet is however a great let-down, as his appointment to the comparatively minor Cabinet portfolio of Minister for Youth and Sports is a great injustice when he should be appointed to more substantive responsibilities.

In all our lives, have we ever heard Kit Siang gave such accolades to an Umno leader? Unless there is an ulterior motive to it, (such as his praise towards Tengku Razaleigh during the period where Ku Li was pandering towards Pakatan as well as the false magnanimity on Ghani Othman), Lim Kit Siang would rather lick sandpaper than to give such praises. And Kit Siang was not the only leader in Pakatan that had commended Khairy; there were many, many more. His perceived ‘value’ must be really, really high here in the political atmosphere.

And just like any other spineless and unprincipled politician of his ilk, Lim Kit Siang seemed to whitewash and forgotten all the accusations of corruption that he had levelled against Khairy pre-2008. We can see since last week, many foes from the opposition political parties that had once lambasted him had clearly forgiven him and commended his appointment. This is psychologically possible because they see him as someone who could not command the majority of youth to vote for Barisan Nasional. To vote for him, yes. But not Barisan Nasional. Obviously, this is beneficial for the opposition. Khairy and his supporters will call this – mature politics or politics of unity or politics of empathy or bipartisan politics or whatever justification his team want to sugarcoat his intimacy with the political opponents.

Newsflash, everytime the fence sitters or the easily swayed youths see a Barisan Nasional politician agreeing and pandering with Pakatan Rakyat’s politics, why would they vote for Barisan Nasional at all?

And just like how Anwar did it in the 90s, Khairy seems to appear more frequently in the mainstream media since his appointment than any other ministers more senior than him. It is on daily basis now.

But sadly, what he gave in return for the past 4 years upon being given the task by the party president was not satisfactory. Only hype. Only fluffy events. Only public relations stunts. The important thing – translating new voters and support into votes – were close to zero.

Umno Youth used to be the pressure group, the one that will act should there were any extremist groups bent on toppling the delicate balance of the social contract, were going overboard. But for the past few years, have we heard anything from Umno Youth? They seem to have lost their testicular fortitude. With regards to the current demand by Dong Zong, what is Umno Youth going to do about it? Just lay low and continue to let them rebuke those two highly respected academician and  judge? Just because they were talking ACCORDING to the Constitution?

The Secretary General of DAP also wants an Umno vice president and the Home Minister to apologise over an innocuous statement. What will Umno Youth do? Issue warning through twitter bots and fake twitter accounts? If they are not sleeping, this would be the most manly thing they would do.

How about Ngeh Koo Ham’s tacit insolence towards the Sultan of Johor? Any idea when will Umno Youth let out a squeak?

All these signs are not good. The writing is on the wall. The Prime Minister is sleeping and being serenaded by dozens of advisers. If failure to perform is rewarded by ministership, then the least the Barisan Nasional supporters would demand is, to see a real change among the youths so that they will vote Barisan Nasional in the next general election. And that change certainly won’t be led by Khairy Jamaluddin. Judging by his past performance, it is beyond his selfish persona to actually work FOR the benefit of his party i.e., by getting the much needed votes. Umno Youth has become a lame duck.

Penetrate through the smokescreen and you’ll see only hype but no results.

But what can we expect from someone who got into his position not through merit? Do we honestly think he won the position of deputy Youth leader uncontested back in 2004 through pure merit? Back in 2009, although he was found guilty of corruption by the Umno disciplinary board but by virtue of being the son in law of the Prime Minister at that time he could continue to contest and eventually won the Umno YOuth chief post amidst allegations of bribery and money politics. All that is not merit. And we thought an Oxford graduate could win on his own two feet and save the world singlehandedly. Arguably, he could not even deliver Saluran 4 and 5.

Unless of course he can prove it once and for all in this new ministry whether more youth and new voters will vote for Barisan Nasional. But then again, I want to tell the ordinary Umno members, please do not get your hopes high.

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The Minister in a TuneTalk T-shirt inadvertently promoting his close friend’s company.

Those who shouldn’t be contesting

The year is travelling so fast and before we know it, March is already upon us. And within then next 45 days, there will be a new line up of cabinet ministers that will administer this country for the next 5 years.

Back in 2009, a post was written regarding the newly appointed cabinet by the then newly minted Prime Minister, Najib Razak. On hindsight, that article was a balance between a crystal ball of “I told you so!” and something that is totally off the mark altogether. But nobody is perfect.

But what is important, in order to have a really strong government, the candidates contesting for this coming general election have to right.

We need people who are energetic, wise, intelligent, credible and above all, have the integrity to be respected by most. This applies for both sides of the divide. The highest law making body in the land is made up with lawmakers from all parties be it the Barisan Nasional or Pakatan Rakyat.

This time around, I honestly feel there are few people that should not offer themselves as candidates in the next general election.

They are:

1) Nik Aziz

He has been the Menteri Besar of Kelantan for 23 years. Already sickly and decrepit, he sometimes suffer bouts of dementia which ultimately lend credence to his senility. Who would forget a youtube video where he said it is okay for a woman to be raped because she did not cover up? At 82 years old, do we honestly think he should not give the younger leaders a chance? Do we expect him to lead Kelantan for the next 5 years until he is 87? Even Dr Mahathir retired at 78.

Back in early 2000s, Nik Aziz made a pledge that should Dr. Mahathir resigned from his premiership, he will resign the very next day as well. It is now 2013. It has been nearly 10 years since Dr. Mahathir resigned. And Nik Aziz is till clinging to power like it is the most important thing in this world. Although the afterlife is what PAS leaders always say they are focussing on, it is insignificant thing like politics is what they cherish more.

Nik Aziz should just retire.

2) Rais Yatim

What can we say about Rais Yatim which has not been said already? Turning 71 this year, surely there are more capable people that can lead the information ministry in ways so much better than he could. If he had done his job well, there will be a lot more people supporting Barisan Nasional right now. But fiasco after fiasco and bad decision making are the hallmark of his ministry.

Who could forget the Merdeka Day fiasco last year where he mishandled the issues on the merdeka theme and and the Janji Ditepati song? Even the simplest issue like merdeka logo which was made in haste and in bad taste could not be successfully mitigated by his ministry.

Surely, the Jelebu parliamentary which had been held strong by Rais Yatim all these years can afford to have a change of guard. Please do not tell us that should he is not selected as the candidate in the next general election, Jelebu will fall. That means, Rais Yatim is doing a terrible job in succession planning. Or he is a good job in promoting himself as an individual, but a really bad job in promoting his party, the Barisan Nasional.

Either way, it is time to retire. He may think he has a lot more to offer, but in actual truth and honesty, he doesn’t. Do we need a minister who will be a minister till he is 76?

3) Lim Kit Siang

Poor old Lim Kit Siang. The only thing that can make him feel relevant is to hold on to the number one post in DAP for as long as possible. He has been the supremo for that party since Tun Razak was the prime minister. That is more than 40 years of being the ruler of DAP!

Already 72 years old, what more do we need from him? He can always write his thoughts in his blog rather than be involved directly in Malaysian politics. All those time spewing hatred and giving out supremacist speeches in rallies must be tiring for an old man like him. He has already established a dynasty within his party. His son, daughter in law, and perhaps his grandson will definitely hold the reins of the party long after he is gone. So his legacy is intact. There is nothing to worry about.

It is time to go Uncle Kit. Do us this favour or you will die in office as the longest serving party dictator in this part of the region.

4) Karpal Singh

73 year old Karpal Singh is another old guard that has to go otherwise together with the names mentioned above, we shall probably have to put him as an exhibit in Jurassic Park in Melaka.

Already wheelchair-bound, it is such an inhumane thing for us voters to force him to continue servicing us as an MP. Most of us do not know the demands and the punishing schedule of an MP. There is not enough hours and minutes in their typical day. I just hope the party leadership in DAP will be more merciful to Karpal Singh. Honestly, I do not think Karpal Singh have the energy to face another 5 years of politicking anymore. What more with his often tumultuous relationship with Anwar Ibrahim and his compatriots in PAS.

Let the old man rest.

5) Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah

Ku Li has been an MP since 1969. One of the longest MPs still serving in our current day Parliament. Although he is still sharp at 76, I think it is high time Kelantan Umno find a replacement for his candidacy in Gua Musang. Please do not tell us that Kelantan Umno will only think about a suitable successor for Gua Musang only when Ku Li is 81 at the 14th general election in 2018. That would be a huge mistake.

Do it now when his majority for Gua Musang in the last 2008 election is still high. Surely Ku Li do not expect to be an MP forever? Please do not pull a Nik Aziz on us.

6) Khairy Jamaluddin

Now although he is still young (37), he did actually made a decision not defend his Rembau seat back in 2011. In order to maintain the integrity of all Barisan Nasional candidates, we hope Khairy will act as he had promised unless he is willing to be seen as an attention seeker who suffer bouts of knee-jerk reaction and talking without thinking syndrome. We need leaders with principles. Not drama queens.

Although we hate to see him go since he had done quite well in the youth front, we do wish him well in his future undertakings. Bon voyage.

Khairy confirms he won’t defend Rembau seat

PETALING JAYA: Umno Youth chief Khairy Jamaluddin has confirmed speculation on social networking site Twitter that he will not defend his Rembau seat in the next general election.

When asked to verify the speculation that he might not contest in the 13th general election, Khairy replied “yes” via SMS.

He had earlier created quite a buzz in Twitter when he sent a tweet about taking a break from politics.

“Hope to help win more youth support for BN (Barisan Nasional) in 2011 & work hard preparing for elections. Then I’m taking a break from politics. Can’t wait,” Khairy wrote on Twitter.

His tweet generated much response from his followers who wondered if the Rembau MP was not going to defend his seat in the 13th general election.

“I would like to ‘stand down’ as they say in the UK. A couple of things I’d like to do before it gets too late,” tweeted Khairy in response to a follower who asked him what he meant by a “break”.

Asked how long he planned to be away from politics, Khairy replied: “Indefinite. Not sure what I will be doing. A few things I want to do like go back to school.”

Khairy first mentioned the possibility of not defending his seat in an interview with a newsportal last July.

At that time, he clarified his statement a day later, saying he was only mulling the possibility and that he had yet to make a firm decision on the matter.

7) All other Pakatan Rakyat leaders

If we do not have integrity and principles, then we are less of a human being than an animal. We stood our ground because we have principles. We are respected and treated seriously because we have integrity.

In 1969, the now defunct Labour Party boycotted and did not enter the general election that year because they thought the Alliance could not tolerate the existence non-communal opposition party with leftist tendency and that to participate in that election would be to condone communal elections.

That is what we call a principled decision with highest integrity.

Our Labour Party was not the first nor were they the last to have done that. In Egypt recently, the opposition had decided not to contest in the upcoming election due to transparency issue.

Therefore it is really questionable and their integrity found wanting when Pakatan Rakyat decided to contest in this 13th General Election when time and time again they have shouted on top of their lungs that this general election will be the dirtiest ever with a lot of ‘discrepancies’ and very ‘dirty’ electoral rolls.

But at the same time they are bragging that they can win up to 140 seats this time around. Again, how do they reconcile this differing point of view?

On one hand they claim that BN will ensure that they will win it by hook or by crook, but on the other hand they assured the voters that Pakatan will win 140 seats! Are they confused? Again if we do not have the integrity, it will make you look stupid. People will disrespect you.

What they should have done is to boycott the very system they said to have failed them. Why enter a race which you know is unfair from the start? Why waste money and resources?

Thus, all these skulduggery are just another one of their acts. An act of an unprincipled and dishonest venture for power.

In order for them to regain trust, they should just stand up, own up and be a man or don’t stand at all.

Straigthening out YB Khairy Jamaluddin’s column

Below is an excellent article by blogger SatD of Pure Shiite. It is to reinforce the MPs into doing the right thing instead of skirting over the problem and sweeping the mess under the carpet. This mess, if left untreated, will torment your own children and grandchildren in the future. Although some of YB Khairy’s points are valid, he had completely misread the wordings in the Constitution as pointed out by the blogger SatD. I am copying the first half of his article. The juicier parts can be further digested here. You can also give your comments there. Thank you.

_________________________________________________________

YB Khairy, what “Virtual Constitutional Guarantee” are you talking about?

Dear YB Khairy.

I was recently notified of your recent column published in the Edge, thank you for having the guts to venture into the subject matter.

Allow me to reproduce your full piece for my readers.

Engage multiculturalism early on

I think the biggest elephant in the 1Malaysia room is the societal behaviour of Malaysians themselves. I do not deny that national unity suffers from politics, political parties and politicians.

People in my profession – from all parties (even those that claim to be multiracial) – are routinely guilty of ethnocentric politics, reaching out to different communities at the expense of others. Politics is also a reflection of the society that we live in. And the fact of the matter is many Malaysians still live in silos with a heightened sense of suspicion towards other ethnic communities.

But rather than philosophising about this fundamental question in generalities, I attempted to address the policy-making behind the often ephemeral question of national unity during the debate on the Agong’s Royal Address in Parliament recently.

It is often said that the reason why racial polarisation is worse today than a few generations back is simply because there is less contact and interaction now. Those who attended local universities in the 1960s and 70s will regale you with stories of how students of different ethnicity hung out together, in marked contrast to the scenes at our varsities today where posses of friends are usually mono-ethnic.

Some have pointed out that the problem starts much earlier, during the formative years of young Malaysians. The fact that today more Malaysian kids of Chinese ethnicity attend vernacular schools rather than national schools contributes to the drastic reduction in contact hours between our children.

Although many of these students end up in national secondary schools, there is already a psychological perspective that has been formed during the earlier (and arguably most impressionable) years of their education in which they grew up in largely mono-ethnic environments. Of course, there are non-Chinese students who attend Chinese vernacular schools but for the most part, the overwhelming majority of children there are from one ethnic group.

One solution to address this polarity that has been brought about by the existence of different types of schools in Malaysia has been to just have one school – the national school. Advocates for this argument say that for as long as vernacular schools exist, our kids will be separated during their formative years and will carry with them a ‘silo-ed’ worldview into their teenage years and beyond.

While there are great merits to this argument, principally the notion that all Malaysian children will be educated under one roof and all the wonderful consequences that this might have on national unity, I doubt there would be any government that would commit themselves to this. Vernacular schools are a virtually sacrosanct institution for many members of the Chinese and Indian communities for which they have a virtual constitutional guarantee for it’s continued existence.

So, rather than pursuing something well near impossible, we are left with trying to find ways towards greater unity while acknowledging the continued existence of different systems in our education system. For a few years, the government’s flagship program to break down the walls that separate our kids has been the national service stint in which SPM leaders are selected at random to spend three months in a quasi-bootcamp where they are taught leadership, teamwork, civic virtue, nation-building in a contained environment.

The architects of the program believed that this could be the magic panacea to cure racial polarisation, social ills and instill a much needed “Malaysia Boleh” sense of pride and patriotism which is apparently not pronounced enough among our youth.

As someone who served on the first national service training council (the body tasked with overseeing the implementation of the programme), I was able to visit some of the camps during the training period. It goes without saying that most participants have fun during their stint. For most young people, the opportunity for adventure and to bond with others of the same age is something that they would naturally be attracted to.

Hence, when the government releases surveys done on national service participants, it is no big surprise that most of them enjoyed their three months. But beyond a superficial analysis of feedback from national service participants, we need to ask whether or not the program has succeeded in making young Malaysians mix around better with one another and, more importantly, believe that the national interest always trumps sectarian or communal considerations.

Anecdotal evidence suggests the situation is less encouraging than one might hope, for the simple reason that many participants enter the program having grown up in relative ethnic isolation. Formative years do not begin at age 17 or 18, when perspectives – including those regarding communal identities – have most likely hardened. I dare say it has never been clear how three months after SPM can possibly overcome years of polarisation. There is of course nothing inherently wrong with the national service programme; but we need to take a step back and face the very real probability that we asking far too much of it – it is not the magic panacea.

Now, if our goal is inculcating a sense of national identity over and above communal persuasions, why not begin at precisely those formative years of a child’s life? During my speech, I touched on the Student Integration Plan for Unity (RIMUP).

Initially introduced in 1986 but never gained a foothold until its revival as a key initiative under the National Education Blueprint 2006-2010. It has since withered away once again. Involving primary school students of different races from national and national-type, vernacular schools to regularly engage in a range of usually co-curricular activities, we have in RIMUP a practical and actionable initiative to encourage early inter-ethnic interaction.

It is actionable in as much as it does not require us venturing into the constitutional and political labyrinth of arguing for a single school system or sidestepping political landmines associated with the Vision School proposal (putting one national school, one Chinese school and one Tamil school in the same compound). It is practical because its nature as an activity-based program on school grounds means RIMUP does not involve extensive infrastructural commitments.

The potential and relative ease of implementation thus makes it rather curious that, across the levels of policymaking and discourse, RIMUP is not given anywhere near the attention it deserves. A study conducted by school inspectors in 2007 revealed that only 27% of schools were extensively and regularly involved in RIMUP activities. Further, only 12% of them conducted post mortems or discussions on how to improve activities organized under RIMUP.

The figures on fiscal expenditure are not much more flattering. RIMUP was allocated only RM25.8 million in 2007. Compare this to the public spending on the national service programme, which stands at an average of RM595.7 million per year from 2009 to 2011 – twenty times more than RIMUP. The glaring asymmetry is further illustrated by the fact that no details on RIMUP were provided in the Federal Government Spending Estimates for 2011.

When I finally received an answer from the Deputy Minister of Education on how much the Government has allocated for RIMUP in 2011, I almost couldn’t believe my ears when he said RM2.4 million. National service will receive RM564 million this year. You do the maths.

I urge the Government to immediately remedy the situation by revitalising RIMUP as a central initiative of promoting national unity organically, as it were. The national service has its many advantages but why pin the entire unity project on it when it can be supplemented by a rather understated program that is so readily incorporated into a child’s everyday life at school?

At stake is no less than the viability of this nation’s multicultural and multiracial character. For too long we have taken a disengaged stance about multiculturalism, self-enchanted by the rhetorical allure of ‘unity in diversity’ without necessarily promoting cross-cultural and cross-communal engagement.

This approach, I believe, is mistaken. A multiculturalism that is satisfied with leaving each other to live in parallel lives is inherently self-destructive; it engenders precisely the prejudices and paranoia that ‘unity in diversity’ is meant to displace.

1Malaysia implores us to move beyond tolerance for good reason – tolerance of the alien is never enough. Rather, a Malaysian identity requires, first, an empathic recognition of each other’s cultural particularities, and then an embrace of the ways in which cross-cultural contact may enrich our own lives. Postponing this project to age 17 or 18 will not do. Source here.

As a strong advocate of the Single School, allow me present to you our side of the story more clearly so that going forward you may have a better bearing in navigating the “constitutional and political labyrinth” with regards to this issue.

First of all there is No such thing as a Virtual Constitutional Guarantee with regards to the Continued existence of Vernacular School.

In fact it is actually against the Constitution of Malaysia and the National Language Act. Allow me to refer to two court judgements where the issue of medium of instruction in a Foreign Language have been put to test.

Case 1 Mark Koding

The question therefore arises as to the true interpretation of proviso (a) to Article 152(1). Having regard to the words used in the proviso, viz. “teaching or learning any other language” as opposed to “teaching or learning in any other language”, I tend to agree with the restricted meaning enunciated by Abdoolcader J when dealing with schools or other educational institutions. In my view, under proviso (a), although the National Language shall be the Malay language, the usage of any other language other than for official purposes, is guaranteed; so is the teaching or learning of any other language in schools, be it Chinese, Tamil, Arabic or English. But there is nothing in proviso (a) to justify the extension of the protection to the operation of schools where the medium of instruction is Chinese, Tamil, Arabic or English. This strict interpretation is consistent with proviso (b) which guarantees the right of the Federal Government or any State Government to preserve and sustain the use and study of the language of any other community in the Federation. Thus, the preservation and sustenance of usage of language of any other community is guaranteed. So is the preservation and sustenance of study of any other community’s language, but again there is no justification in extending the guarantee to the preservation and sustenance of study in the language of any other community in the absence of specific words to that effect. Any other interpretation of proviso (a) would result in abusing the words used in the proviso. It is absurd for instance to think that the proviso gives constitutional protection to teaching or learning in school where the medium of instruction is Russian or Japanese. To my mind, the protection only extends to language but not to medium of instruction in schools. In other words, no person shall be prohibited or prevented from teaching or learning Chinese or Tamil or, for that matter, any language which is not the national language in any school as a language subject, but such protection does not extend to the teaching or learning in a school where the teaching or learning is in any other language. As correctly stated by Abdoolcader J the omission of the preposition “in” after the words “teaching or learning” in proviso (a) makes the distinction necessary

Case 2 Merdeka University

Reading Article 152 together with the National Language Act, in our judgment, the law may be stated as follows:

* Bahasa is the national language;
* Bahasa is the official language;

A person is prohibited from using any other language for official purposes — subject to exceptions as regards the continued use of the English language allowed by s 4 and of other languages by other provisions of the National Language Act;

* No person shall be prohibited or prevented from using (to be specific) Chinese for unofficial purposes;
* No person shall be prohibited or prevented from teaching Chinese;
* No person shall be prohibited or prevented from learning Chinese;

The Federal or a State Government has the right to preserve and sustain the use and study of the language of any non-Malay community — as indeed the Federal Government is doing in school and at the Institute of Technology, Mara, and in the Departments of Chinese and Indian Studies and in some other departments at the University of Malaya where even Arabic, Japanese, Thai and other languages are taught. (This right belongs to Government).

Government cannot legally prohibit or prevent MU from teaching and offering courses to enable students to learn Chinese.

But the crucial question is: would MU be prohibited from teaching in Chinese as the sole or major medium of instruction? It certainly would if it is a public authority, for then the use of Chinese there would be use for an official purpose which the Constitution read together with the National Language Act says is prohibited.

And this is their decision

In any event, bearing in mind the history of education in this country and the divisive results of allowing separate language schools and the lesson learned from the experience of our neighbour with a private university and the determination of Parliament to so regulate schools and universities and education generally as an instrument for bringing about one nation out of the disparate ethnic elements in our population, we have no choice but to hold, as we have already held, that MU if established would be a public authority within Article 160(2) of the Constitution and that accordingly teaching in Chinese there would be use of that language for an official purpose, which use may be prohibited under Article 152.

As there is no right to use the Chinese language for an official purpose, accordingly in our judgment it was not unconstitutional and unlawful of Government to reject the plaintiff’s petition to establish MU.

We would therefore dismiss this appeal with costs.
For more details on the Legal Basis go here

To be completely honest with you YB Khairy, I’m bored of writing about this subject, especially to address the misconception with regards to the “Constitutional Guarantee”, too many people are walking around like zombies believing in this “Virtual” non existence guarantees.

If you don’t mind me asking, which part of the Constitution says that there is a “Virtual Guarantee”? As an MP you of all people should have studied the document better and to actually look at Article 152 and our National Language Act and perhaps inquire further how they have been interpreted in the court of law.

How did you come up with such strong conclusions that it is impossible and you actually use the words ” I doubt that any Government would commit themselves to this….” YB Khairy, is it not the objective of the Government and the Members of the Parliament to ensure that all the provisions of our Constitution and the National Language Act is adhered to?

MORE QUESTIONS WERE ASKED HERE

________________________________________

Similar articles to this subject can be read here and here.

What shouldn’t make a minister?

I heard a cabinet reshuffle is coming real soon.

This will mark the start of Prime Minister Dato Sri Najib Tun Razak’s leadership for the critical 2011. The year where we shall see the beginnings of the transformation project he has set forth for the nation. Also, to witness the early results of these transformations. All are expected to come sometime during the tail end of 2011.

Now, the importance in selecting cabinet members cannot be understated. It is not child’s play. And it is certainly not hinge on the whims and fancy of the Prime Minister. He needs to tread this carefully and select the cabinet members based on certain winnable criteria (as if he needs someone to tell him that).

May I suggest that those who walk in the corridors of power to perform integrity checks on any potential cabinet members. Proper test must be made in order to gauge whether a person is fit to fill in the shoes of a cabinet minister or deputy minister post.

And these tests will include medical and mental tests as well. And importantly, a negative check list must be updated by the relevant authorities for the Prime Minister to have a proper positive and negative assessment of the potential candidates.

And above all, a candidate must not have any litigation suit or impending court case that may tarnish the whole image and reputation of the cabinet.

Why create more fodder for the opposition to attack the government?

Thus I am quite concern that Umno Youth leader, who is currently facing a defamation suit will be made cabinet minister soon. As I am sure the Prime Minister has already made up his mind and of course, the former’s appointment as a deputy minister is already inevitable, the threat of a RM100 million lawsuit looming in the horizon might cause an unnecessary hassle for Barisan Nasional. Especially if the court hearing and judgment is so near the upcoming general election.

The case itself is quite serious. Anwar Ibrahim is suing him for defamatory statements made. In December 2008, a judge had ruled in favor of the plaintiff through a judgment in default from the High Court when he failed to enter an appearance after the summons had been served on him.

However in September 2010, due to technicalities, he had successfully set aside the judgment-in-default and will be scheduled for trial. The risk can already be quantified. RM100 million. And loss of reputation by the Cabinet. He needs to see through this defamation case properly before can be admitted into the cabinet.

Regardless, I think it would be wise if due diligence takes into account any impending litigation suits by a potential candidate. Any responsible leader would have done so.

It is a standard practice for all takeovers and mergers acquisitions process in the corporate world. Shouldn’t this be emulated in the leadership and governance process too? Or does Barisan Nasional has really thick bullet proof vest that can withstand all the political attacks by the opposition in the run up to the next general election?

Just a thought.

Thank you.

An honest opinion on YB Khairy’s speech

In his closing speech just now YB Khairy Jamaluddin called for his Pemuda members to “cakap yang benar biarpun pahit”.

With that in mind, I would like to take this opportunity to review his policy address which he made this morning. It won’t be a pleasant read for some people but since we are in the spirit of telling the truth and in the spirit of improving ourselves for the better, we shall dissect and make some sense to what he was trying to say.

First off, his speech was entitled “MAQASID DAN MANHAJ PERJUANGAN”.

Why do we have to Arabicize Malay words?

Maqasid means ‘matlamat’ while Manhaj means ‘pendekatan’. Please don’t do an Anwar Ibrahim and try to substitute proper Malay words with Arabic words. It makes you sound phony and trying too hard; just like Anwar Ibrahim.

Somebody told me that instead of dismissing his speech outright, I must give credit to where it’s due. That is fair enough. In all 73 paragraphs of his speech, not all needs to be criticised. Some have good arguments and there are a few that I can relate to. But there are a few paragraphs that I do not agree with and this is where I vent my frustrations towards this Ketua Pemuda of United Malay National Organisation.

Some of these paragraphs are:

As UMNO Youth Leader, I meet many young Malays from all levels of society. When I speak of the NEP and the Malay struggle, they retort: “Pardon me, but what have I ever received from the NEP?” Their incomes are below the poverty line, many of them have migrated to cities where the cost of living rises faster than what they earn. These are Malays, Bumiputeras, but they have never enjoyed the fruits of the NEP. Their perception is that the NEP only enriches a few elite Bumiputeras with strong political links. For these youths, the 30 percent equity target does not mean anything because most of them never have and never will be able to purchase shares. This is yet another example of leakages where the NEP, which was rooted on the notion of prosperity for all, ended up being seen as an elitist policy resulting in many Malays sidelined and not looked after.

I find this very alarming coming from the Ketua Pemuda himself. Is he saying that his understanding of the NEP is limited to the number of shares and equity holding of the Malays? How sad that he cannot rebuke those young Malays that he met using arguments that the NEP had given them access to a lot of opportunities that did not exist before NEP was created?

All the many universities that were built, all the funds that were set up to  pull the Malays out from hardcore poverty, all the many schools that was built when not many were built before 1970; all these were part of the NEP that these young Malays are given privilege to enjoy. All these are direct benefits that come from the NEP. These are only a few examples that Khairy could give to them. He could even say that business opportunities are given to them if they work hard. In the days before the NEP an ordinary Malay could not have access to these opportunities even if they had worked hard because no opportunities were given to them. Access was limited.

If Pemuda Umno cannot rebut a simple retort from the simple young Malays he met all these while, then he therefore does not know what NEP is and certainly do not know the history of Umno’s struggle. Yet, he made a highly rhetorical statement in one of his paragraphs:

What is required today is a politics based on thoughts and ideas. The current political sphere is no longer entirely about the struggle for power, but a competiton of minds, a battle of ideas. Like it or not, those who challenge our political ideology must be defeated through the sharpness of our intellect and the superiority of our arguments, not by relying on executive power.

What sharpness of intellect can we really see here when he could not even properly explain to the young people the successes and the benefits NEP had brought to the Malays? Instead, he had used the raw, unprocessed thinking of those young ones (who really should have been educated further by Umno Youth) as the justification to condemn the NEP further.

I am further inclined to believe that Umno Youth is not focusing on the ‘software’ of the youth generation. Instead, they are focusing on the hard figures. Yes, you have gained new members. Yes you got new voters. But what kind of members and new voters do you have? Ones that do not know why, how and what the objectives of Umno are?

Does all the Umno youth members know the history of its ‘matlamat’ and ‘pendekatan’? Even the Ketua Pemuda doesn’t seem to know it. If not, he could have easily swayed the youth not to be too critical of the NEP. You do not have to offer them shares or business contracts  just to make them love the NEP mind you.

There is a paragraph that I do not understand due to the underlying contradiction:

The new manhaj must be guided by merit and needs. Merit stresses on staying power and competitiveness. Merit means the Malay who has the ability, talent and high potential will be discovered, assisted along the way and given ample room to succeed. Merit also demands a level playing field so that the most innovative of farmers, the most diligent of traders, the most knowledgeable of professors and the most competent of contractors are provided with all the encouragement necessary without barriers in the form of political interests or the lack political connections. God-willing, with the inculcation of these new values and culture in the manhaj of empowerment for our people, the Malays will be better equipped to compete on the world stage, without the need for ‘crutches’ anymore.

So, a Malay who has the ability and talent will be discovered and helped and encouraged along the way to be successful. That is what he call ‘merit based system’. Isn’t all these ‘help’ and ‘encouragement’ can be termed as ‘crutches’?

Or in other words, one of the many policies in the affirmative actions of the NEP?

I am confused with Khairy’s definition of meritocracy. It contradicts itself. It is certainly not the same with the meritocracy concept which Lim Kit Siang proposes.

Plus, Khairy should be the last person to talk about meritocracy because all the years he has been in politics, he gained prominence through sheer nepotism. If he had not married into Tun Abdullah Badawi’s family, where do you think he could be now? Certainly not as Ketua Pemuda because he could have never won the Deputy Umno Youth Chief unchallenged in 2004. He won it because he was the infamous son in law of the current Umno President at that time.

He then spoke at length on the Malay unity. When the Deputy President last night touched on the importance of Malay unity, Khairy seemed to think that there is nothing we can do about in unifying the Malays for the sake of greater good. He even resigned to state that:

“saya juga sedar bahawa telah terpahat dalam sejarah yang Melayu itu jarang sekali bersatu. Dalam lipatan sejarah moden, kecuali dalam penentangan terhadap Malayan Union dan perjuangan kemerdekaan, orang Melayu acap berpecah terutama dalam pemahaman dan ideologi politik.”

Although he did not reject the possibility of Malay unity, he stated that:

We must accept the reality that today the Malay vote is split. There is no Malay party – be it UMNO or PAS – that can secure a hundred percent of Malay votes. In many areas, the Malay political split is such that 50 percent are on one side and 50 percent on the other. This means that any side wanting to win, must win with the support of all Malaysians, regardless of race and religion. If we hope to rely on the Malay vote alone, we should be mindful that there are only 73 Parliamentary seats with a dominant Malay majority of 70 percent and above. Such is the reality.

We must learn from the results of the last General Elections where we almost relinquished power due to the loss of support from non-Malays. If we still subscribe to the illusion that we can win without their support, then 50 seats currently held by BN are in grave danger. If there is no concerted effort to practise an inclusive and moderate leadership, UMNO’s Malay leadership will disappear come the next election.

Most assuredly the main responsibility of winning over support from non-Malays lies on the shoulders of certain component parties. Whatever weaknesses they have must be overcome immediately and the responsibilities entrusted upon them must be vigorously carried out. But in the current state of politics – moreoever with the concept of 1Malaysia being our collective compass – Malaysians want to see a BN that can practise the values of camaraderie, justice and fairness.

Those are the words that kept niggling in my conscience. I stated in my previous article that Umno must understand their role in Barisan Nasional. Umno must be at the forefront of the Malay struggle. Obviously when Umno is fighting for Malay empowerment and rights, it doesn’t contradict the Constitution. So there is nothing to be afraid of.

Barisan Nasional is the multiracial party that governs the government.

Umno, MCA, MIC and a dozen of other component parties must perform their roles for each of their community or groups of the same political idealogy.

If MCA and MIC have not been inclusive in their own party conventions, and have not shown us the values of camaraderie, justice and fairness, why should Umno subrogate the roles of those two parties in wooing their voters?

Isn’t it easier to be find ways to unify the Malays in Umno and Pas rather than Umno putting on multiple caps just to please others?

Unification of the Malays will make make the Malays even stronger. Is this not the ‘matlamat’ of Umno Youth?

I have said many times, the easiest way for the component parties to win any voters is to stick to the Constitution. All BN parties must ‘perjuangkan Perlembagaan Malaysia’. The spirit of the Constitution must be upheld. No parties will feel left out if everyone of them stick to what our founding fathers had laid out for us. We are all guided by it.

And for everything that is holy in the universe, Barisan Nasional lost support in General Elections 2008 was not solely because Umno lost support of the non-malays. People of all races did not vote Barisan Nasional because the leadership at that time was corrupt, arrogant, too flamboyant and did not manage the economy well. If you identified wrongly the causes of the losses, you will administer the wrong prescriptions to the problem. Hence, the wrong diagnosis and prognosis of the Ketua Pemuda in the paragraphs mentioned above.

Therefore, I am disappointed with the way Pemuda Umno is going.

I was further left disappointed when he said this:

When we fail to understand and appreciate the feelings of other races, the barriers that separate us become higher and thicker. Young Malaysians live within the confines of their own ethnic communities. The young Malay who attends religious school, a Middle Eastern university and watches Malay programs on Astro Ria is alien to the young Chinese attending a vernacular school, a Taiwanese university and entertained by Wah Lai Toi. Each perpetuates mutual prejudices because of these barriers that exist.

Stopping short of calling for a single stream education for Malaysia, he recognised the barriers but dared not say any viable solution for these problems. Instead he added on:

The 1Malaysia concept needs to be held as a shared aspiration amongst all races. Community life in a multi-ethnic country certainly demands much patience and courtesy from everyone. We should not hastily pointing fingers at each other in the face of any issue, big or small. We need to understand the feelings of other people if we want them to understand ours. We all need to imagine ourselves in each other’s shoes, assume we swap places, switch fortunes, only then can we appreciate the universal truth that our shared humanity unites us more than it divides. Malaysians need to give and take between one another and this by no means entails one side only taking and the other only giving. Let the fate and future of this country, whether we fail or succeed, be determined together by us all.

Please tell us how all those above can be achieved after the paragraph before it had exposed the huge problem of our society? How can Malaysians understand the feelings of one another if they live in a segregated society? It easy for him to say rhetorical things like this but coming way short on the substance. The solution is staring straight in our face yet the Ketua Pemuda, the one who tried to be inclusive and propagating collective interest of the nation seemed to be too timid to even mention this.

Those above are the things that irritate me the most during his speech this morning. I also do not agree when he said something about the May 13, 1969 incident. But the sharp among us can see the shortcomings of that particular paragraph without me elaborating it further.

Other than the things I mentioned above, the speech was commendable. I apologise if this is a bitter pill to swallow. But I must for the sake of Agama, Bangsa and Negara. Thank you.

The Quintuplets in Umno

Update: A Voice wrote a similar piece here.

_____________________original article:

There is a lot of stupidity going on in Umno these days. This legion of stupidity is headed by Datuk Seri Nazri Aziz, Datuk Seri Zahid Hamidi, Datuk Seri Tengku Adnan, Datuk Khaled Nordin and Khairy Jamaluddin himself.

This quintuplet of misguided souls will spell the end of Umno’s political hegemony if Dato’ Sri Najib Tun Razak could not rein in their extreme views and dare I say it, desperation.

Umno cabinet reshuffle is getting near.

It is normal that those who feel that they are unsafe, will make the most noise. It is pathetic to see all five of them trying to project themselves as relevant to the PM.

YOU SIR!

Yes you.

You remember who this Nazri Aziz is? Do you know which one is he? Wasn’t he the one you hate prior and after the 2008 general election?

Have a read here, here, here and here.

And you think he has the clout to speak on Umno’s behalf? What do you think? And Tengku Adnan? What do you think about him? Even his deputy Ketua Bahagian in Putrajaya does not agree to his statement that Umno will not support Perkasa.

How about Zahid Hamidi? Is he a leader that you can trust?

What do you think?

And Khairy Jamaluddin? Well, we just agree what Datuk Anifah Aman had said about him – someone who is intelligent; but not necessarily wise.

And the fact that many Umno members, especially the Pemuda had embraced and become members of Perkasa just revealed to us that Khairy had lost touch with his own team. And to make a statement that ridicule Perkasa? How would Pemuda members feel? Again, not very wise.

For God’s sake, Perkasa is an NGO. It is not even a political party. We have many Malay NGOs as they are chinese and indian NGOs. They are over 76 malay rights movement in the Majlis Perundingan NGO Melayu. All are championing Malay rights and issues. Most of them are members of Umno. Some Pemuda leaders are leading these NGOs!

Nazri needs to differentiate the differences between an NGO and a political party. Perkasa is not Semangat 46 or PKR. It won’t take away any of your votes. In fact, it will increase votes for Umno.

Do you know why Umno is unable to stem the tide of Perkasa? This is because all the thinking Umno members have joined Perkasa and become more active in it. Umno now, and I do think Najib is unaware of it, is better known as the Unthinking Malay National Organisation. All the brilliant ones are becoming more active in Perkasa.

No wonder everytime the NEAC presented their NEM proposal to MPM, their representatives such as Amirsham and Professor Dr Norma Mansor were shred to pieces! They simply could not muster any facts and figures to back their lopsided proposals which are devoid of any Malay Agenda because they themselves had never made any thorough research of the bumiputera situation!

They relied heavily on foreign consultants.

During one of the NEAC presentation, Amirsham was asked on the inclusiveness of the NEM. One of the delegates asked why wouldn’t NEM urge the government to streamline the national schooling system to make it more inclusive and transform the vernacular schools into proper national schools. His remark? “it is a sensitive subject”. Of which the delegate retorted ‘why is it that NEM would not deem abolishing the 30% quota as sensitive but the removal one of the stumbling block of a unified nation as one? Double standard? Fear of backlash?

Amirsham mumbled some incoherent reply and the matter was left hanging.

Anything regarding poking the Malays are not sensitive. But to cuit sikit the issues of the non-malays, God forbids!

The NEAC could not even retort all the research made by the experts in MPM. The rebuttals of the NEM document led the NEAC to re-study their document. As we all know, NEAC did not make indepth research on their assumptions. When assumptions are erroneous, the solutions will be wrong.

And for the benefit of all who hates Perkasa, they do not disagree completely with the NEM. Only those who are afraid of shadows would think that. MPM conditionally accepts the NEM as long as NEM takes into account a more comprehensive outlook of the bumiputeras. MPM has made suggestions. They are Malaysians too. NEAC thinks only non-Malays are Malaysians?

Hence, Umno looks pathetic against Perkasa because only idiots in Umno are opening their mouths to speak up against this NGO.

So, what’s the beef with this quintuplet?

Easy. Umno cabinet reshuffle is coming up. Sin Chew is half correct when it says there is a power struggle within Umno. There is alright. It is the struggle to keep their power alive. Nazri, Zahid, Adnan, Khaled and Khairy. All are trying to gasp for that air. Perkasa, the NGO, is just giving more rope for this quintuplet to hang themselves.

As the result? The gangster-ish response from Nazri Aziz. And the out of nature remarks from the other four. Why would Umno be upset when an NGO wants to fight for the same thing as Umno had been fighting all this while? Instead of collaborating, these five stooges want to kill Perkasa. Remarkable indeed.

Yes, Najib did say during an Umno meeting that Umno need to distance themselves from Perkasa. Yes he said that. But he did not say that Umno MUST ATTACK Perkasa! Umno must distance themselves from Perkasa in the way that they must set themselves apart from the NGO.

They must organise more activities that will make the public endear themselves to the party. They must organise something better than what Perkasa is doing. They must uphold the agenda Agama, Bangsa dan Negara all the time.

That’s how you distance yourself and set higher standard than Perkasa. But alas, the fools have spoken. They have misconstrued the words from the party president and launched themselves in behaving just like how we know they would behave.

The fact that Tengku Adnan pre-empting the party president by saying that Umno will not support Perkasa is the beginning of the end for Umno. That is the apex of his stupidity. Didn’t he know that the party president had never spoke against Perkasa? Through observation that:

1. He attended a Perkasa event;

2. He met Ibrahim Ali quite a few times and they are at ease with each other;

3. He has made no direct remarks against Perkasa all this while whereas if he had wanted to disavow them, he could have done it much sooner;

4. There is no reason for the PM to change his stand now because Perkasa’s stand has not changed since it was formed.

We can see that it does not look like the PM is against Perkasa. Any sane and reasoned man can see that.

But of course, those who are desperate saw it differently. Their expiry date is getting near and they hope by doing this (although they had misconstrued it), they can gain some brownie points from the PM.

By the way, when an amateurish analysis in The Malaysian Insider stated that Perkasa is undermining Najib’s reforms, it only gives the impression that The Malaysian Insider do not know the difference between 1Malaysia and Malaysian Malaysia.

The writer of that article may think that he is helping Najib pursue his reforms. But the opposite effect is happening. Do you think liberalising the economy and imposing total meritocracy while the Malay political standing is on shaky grounds is wise?

You can be liberal all you want when the Malays are strong economically and unified socially. You want to be meritocratic? By all means. But ensure that the playing field is level and your political powers are intact.

Doing so at the current state will only leave you with ‘yang dikejar tak dapat, yang dikendong berciciran’.

The Malaysian Insider seems afraid of something. And it shows with that highly inaccurate observation of the real situation on the ground. Maybe because the writer himself has never been to the ground. Sitting in a comfortable chair in one of the high buildings in Kuala Lumpur makes his senses dull.

To all the desperadoes trying to attack their own shadows, good luck. You will become a political “has-beens” soon enough.

To PM Najib Tun Razak, I urge you to do the right thing.

Your recent article is apt. You must curtail the extremist views within your cabinet members as a start. Your Ketua Pemuda, Nazri and the other three are beginning to show less tolerance to the views of others. Therefore, do you think they are well equipped to be a member of your team?

Some may think you are talking about Perkasa, Dong Zong, Suqiu, Hindraf, PAS and DAP. But it is Perkasa who will be having the last laugh on this one.

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